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Monetary policy and the Fisher effect

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  • Soderlind, Paul

Abstract

Historical estimates of the informational content in the yield curve may not be relevant after a change in monetary policy. This study uses a small dynamic rational expectations model with staggered price setting to study how monetary policy affects the relation between nominal interest rates, inflation expectations, and real interest rates. The benchmark parameters, including the Fed's loss function parameters, are estimated by maximum likelihood on quarterly U.S. data. The policy experiments include stronger inflation targeting and more active monetary policy.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Policy Modeling.

Volume (Year): 23 (2001)
Issue (Month): 5 (July)
Pages: 491-495

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:23:y:2001:i:5:p:491-495

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505735

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  1. Söderlind, Paul, 1998. "Solution and Estimation of RE Macromodels with Optimal Policy," Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 256, Stockholm School of Economics.
  2. Soderlind, Paul, 1998. " Nominal Interest Rates as Indicators of Inflation Expectations," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 100(2), pages 457-72, June.
  3. Mishkin, Frederic S., 1992. "Is the Fisher effect for real? : A reexamination of the relationship between inflation and interest rates," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 195-215, November.
  4. Fuhrer, Jeffrey C & Moore, George R, 1995. "Monetary Policy Trade-offs and the Correlation between Nominal Interest Rates and Real Output," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(1), pages 219-39, March.
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Cited by:
  1. Amusa, Kafayat & Gupta, Rangan & Karolia, Shaakira & Simo-Kengne, Beatrice D., 2013. "The long-run impact of inflation in South Africa," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 798-812.
  2. Locarno, Alberto & Massa, Massimo, 2005. "Monetary Policy Uncertainty and the Stock Market," CEPR Discussion Papers 4828, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Söderlind, Paul, 2001. "What if the Fed Had Been an Inflation Nutter?," Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 0443, Stockholm School of Economics.
  4. H.a. Mitchell-innes & M.j. Aziakpono & A.p. Faure, 2007. "Inflation Targeting And The Fisher Effect In South Africa: An Empirical Investigation," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 75(4), pages 693-707, December.
  5. Soderlind, Paul, 1999. "Solution and estimation of RE macromodels with optimal policy," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(4-6), pages 813-823, April.
  6. Bill Dupor, 2002. "The Natural Rate of Q," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(2), pages 96-101, May.
  7. Dupor, Bill, 2005. "Stabilizing non-fundamental asset price movements under discretion and limited information," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(4), pages 727-747, May.
  8. Kam, Timothy, 2007. "Interest-rate smoothing in a two-sector small open economy," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 283-304, June.
  9. Tibor Hlédik, 2004. "Quantifying the Second-Round Effects of Supply-Side Shocks on Inflation," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2004(2), pages 121-141.
  10. Fahmy, Yasser A. F. & Kandil, Magda, 2003. "The Fisher effect: new evidence and implications," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 451-465.

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