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Emotional agency appraisals influence responses to preference inconsistent information

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  • Agrawal, Nidhi
  • Han, DaHee
  • Duhachek, Adam
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    Abstract

    Bringing together the literature on emotional appraisals and the literature on biased processing in judgment, two studies investigate how incidental emotions varying in valence and agency influence decision making after exposure to preference consistent vs. inconsistent information. We show that emotions differ in their response to preference inconsistent information due to their differences in self vs. other agency appraisals, whereas no emotional differences were found in response to preference consistent information. Negative emotions associated with other agency appraisals increase resistance to preference inconsistent information whereas negative emotions associated with self agency appraisals encourage acceptance of preference inconsistent information relative to neutral conditions. We show this pattern reverses for positive emotions. These effects were driven by changes in confidence after exposure to inconsistent information and reflected in evaluative judgments. We discuss the significance of these findings for the emotions, preference consistency, and decision-making literatures.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.

    Volume (Year): 120 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 87-97

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jobhdp:v:120:y:2013:i:1:p:87-97

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/obhdp

    Related research

    Keywords: Emotions; Anger; Shame; Pride; Gratitude; Agency appraisals; Preference inconsistent information; Judgment;

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