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I feel, therefore you act: Intrapersonal and interpersonal effects of emotion on negotiation as a function of social power

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  • Overbeck, Jennifer R.
  • Neale, Margaret A.
  • Govan, Cassandra L.
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    Abstract

    We examine how emotion (anger and happiness) affects value claiming and creation in a dyadic negotiation between parties with unequal power. Using a new statistical technique that analyzes individual data while controlling for dyad-level dependence, we demonstrate that anger is helpful for powerful negotiators. They feel more focused and assertive, and claim more value; the effects are intrapersonal, insofar as the powerful negotiator responds to his or her own emotional state and not to the emotional state of the counterpart. On the other hand, effects of emotion are generally not intrapersonal for low-power negotiators: these negotiators do not respond to their own emotions but can be affected by those of a powerful counterpart. They lose focus and yield value. Somewhat surprisingly, the presence of anger in the dyad appears to foster greater value creation, particularly when the powerful party is angry. Implications for the negotiation and power literatures are discussed.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.

    Volume (Year): 112 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 2 (July)
    Pages: 126-139

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jobhdp:v:112:y:2010:i:2:p:126-139

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/obhdp

    Related research

    Keywords: Power Emotion Negotiation Anger Happiness Actor-Partner Interdependence Model;

    References

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    1. Pinkley, Robin L. & Neale, Margaret A. & Bennett, Rebecca J., 1994. "The Impact of Alternatives to Settlement in Dyadic Negotiation," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 57(1), pages 97-116, January.
    2. Anderson, Cameron & Thompson, Leigh L., 2004. "Affect from the top down: How powerful individuals' positive affect shapes negotiations," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 95(2), pages 125-139, November.
    3. Clyman, Dana R., 1995. "Measures of Joint Performance in Dyadic Mixed-Motive Negotiations," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 38-48, October.
    4. Olekalns, Mara & Smith, Philip L. & Walsh, Therese, 1996. "The Process of Negotiating: Strategy and Timing as Predictors of Outcomes," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 68-77, October.
    5. Allred, Keith G. & Mallozzi, John S. & Matsui, Fusako & Raia, Christopher P., 1997. "The Influence of Anger and Compassion on Negotiation Performance," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 70(3), pages 175-187, June.
    6. Kay, Aaron C. & Jost, John T., 2003. "Complementary Justice: Effects of "Poor But Happy" and "Poor But Honest" Stereotype Exemplars on System Justification and Implicit Activation of the Justice Motive," Research Papers 1753r, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
    7. Tiedens, Larissa Z., 2001. "Anger and Advancement versus Sadness and Subjugation: The Effect of Negative Emotion Expressions on Social Status Conferral," Research Papers 1615, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
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    Cited by:
    1. Chua, Roy Y.J. & Morris, Michael W. & Mor, Shira, 2012. "Collaborating across cultures: Cultural metacognition and affect-based trust in creative collaboration," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 118(2), pages 116-131.

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