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The industry origins of Japanese economic growth

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  • Jorgenson, Dale W.
  • Nomura, Koji

Abstract

This paper presents new data on the sources of growth for the Japanese economy over the period 1960- 2000. The principal innovation is the incorporation of detailed information for individual industries, including those involved in the production of computers, communications equipment, and electronic components as information technology equipment. We show that economic growth is dominated by investments and productivity growth in information technology, both for individual industries and the economy as a whole. We also show that the revival of total factor productivity growth accounts for the modest resurgence of the Japanese economy since 1995.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of the Japanese and International Economies.

Volume (Year): 19 (2005)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages: 482-542

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jjieco:v:19:y:2005:i:4:p:482-542

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622903

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References

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  1. Basu, Susanto & Fernald, John G., 1995. "Are apparent productive spillovers a figment of specification error?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 165-188, August.
  2. Susanto Basu & John G. Fernald & Matthew D. Shapiro, 2001. "Productivity Growth in the 1990s: Technology, Utilization, or Adjustment?," NBER Working Papers 8359, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Basu, Susanto & Fernald, John G, 1997. "Returns to Scale in U.S. Production: Estimates and Implications," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(2), pages 249-83, April.
  4. Stephen D. Oliner & Daniel E. Sichel, 2000. "The resurgence of growth in the late 1990s: is information technology the story?," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2000-20, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  5. Dale W. Jorgenson, 1996. "Investment - Vol. 1: Capital Theory and Investment Behavior," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262100568, December.
  6. Bruce T. Grimm & Brent R. Moulton & David B. Wasshausen, 2002. "Information Processing Equipment and Software in the National Accounts," BEA Papers 0020, Bureau of Economic Analysis.
  7. Ellen Dulberger, 1993. "Sources of Price Decline in Computer Processors : Selected Electronic Components," NBER Chapters, in: Price Measurements and Their Uses, pages 103-124 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Jeremy I. Bulow & Lawrence H. Summers, 1982. "The Taxation of Risky Assets," NBER Working Papers 0897, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Kyoji Fukao & Tomohiko Inui & Hiroki Kawai & Tsutomu Miyagawa, 2004. "Sectoral Productivity and Economic Growth in Japan, 1970–98: An Empirical Analysis Based on the JIP Database," NBER Chapters, in: Growth and Productivity in East Asia, NBER-East Asia Seminar on Economics, Volume 13, pages 177-228 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Stephen D. Oliner, 1990. "Constant-quality price change, depreciation, and retirement of mainframe computers," Working Paper Series / Economic Activity Section 110, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  11. Berndt, Ernst R. & Fuss, Melvyn A., 1986. "Productivity measurement with adjustments for variations in capacity utilization and other forms of temporary equilibrium," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1-2), pages 7-29.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Dale W. Jorgenson & Kazuyuki Motohashi, 2005. "Information Technology and the Japanese Economy," NBER Working Papers 11801, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Hayashi, Fumio & Nomura, Koji, 2005. "Can IT be Japan's savior?," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 543-567, December.
  3. Robert Dekle & Guillaume Vandenbroucke, 2006. "A quantitative analysis of China’s structural transformation," Working Paper Series 2006-37, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  4. Robert W. Fogel, 2008. "The Impact of the Asian Miracle on the Theory of Economic Growth," NBER Chapters, in: Understanding Long-Run Economic Growth: Geography, Institutions, and the Knowledge Economy, pages 311-354 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Philippe Bacchetta & Eric van Wincoop, 2005. "Incomplete Information Processing: A Solution to the Forward Discount Puzzle," Working Papers 05.03, Swiss National Bank, Study Center Gerzensee.
  6. Ashish Arora & Lee G. Branstetter & Matej Drev, 2010. "Going Soft: How the Rise of Software Based Innovation Led to the Decline of Japan's IT Industry and the Resurgence of Silicon Valley," NBER Working Papers 16156, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Schreyer, Paul, 2009. "User costs and bubbles in land markets," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 267-272, September.
  8. Tatsuyoshi Miyakoshi & Pekka Ilmakunnas, 2009. "What decreases the TFP ? The aging labor and ICT imbalance," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 09-03, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
  9. Shimpo, Kazushige, 2005. "Interindustry effects of productivity growth in Japan: 1960-2000," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 568-585, December.
  10. Hara, Naoko & Ichiue, Hibiki, 2011. "Real-time analysis on Japan's labor productivity," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 107-130, June.
  11. Lee, Chien-Chiang & Chen, Mei-Ping & Chang, Chi-Hung, 2013. "Dynamic relationships between industry returns and stock market returns," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 119-144.

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