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Transition from School to Work in Japan

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  • Genda, Yuji
  • Kurosawa, Masako

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of the Japanese and International Economies.

Volume (Year): 15 (2001)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages: 465-488

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jjieco:v:15:y:2001:i:4:p:465-488

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622903

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Kenn Ariga & Masako Kurosawa & Fumio Ohtake & Masaru Sasaki, 2009. "How do high school graduates in Japan compete for regular, full time jobs? An empirical analysis based upon an internet survey of the youth," KIER Working Papers, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research 678, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
  2. Julen ESTEBAN-PRETEL & NAKAJIMA Ryo & TANAKA Ryuichi, 2009. "Are Contingent Jobs Dead Ends or Stepping Stones to Regular Jobs? Evidence from a Structural Estimation," Discussion papers, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI) 09002, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
  3. Setsuya Fukuda, 2009. "Leaving the parental home in post-war Japan," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 20(30), pages 731-816, June.
  4. Hamaaki, Junya & Hori, Masahiro & Maeda, Saeko & Murata, Keiko, 2013. "How does the first job matter for an individual’s career life in Japan?," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 154-169.
  5. J Taylor & A N Nguyen, 2003. "Transition from school to first job: the influence of educational attainment," Working Papers, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department 540112, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
  6. Susanne Kreitz-Sandberg, 2008. "The influence of sociocultural and environmental factors on the adolescents’ life and development: Japanese youth from a Western readers perspective," Asia Europe Journal, Springer, Springer, vol. 5(4), pages 499-517, January.
  7. Kondo, Ayako, 2007. "Does the first job really matter? State dependency in employment status in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 379-402, September.
  8. OSHIO Takashi & INAGAKI Seiichi, 2014. "Does Initial Job Status Affect Midlife Outcomes and Mental Health? Evidence from a survey in Japan," Discussion papers, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI) 14025, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
  9. Oshio, Takashi & Inagaki, Seiichi, 2013. "Does initial job status affect midlife outcomes and mental health? Evidence from a survey in Japan," CIS Discussion paper series, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University 585, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  10. Polona Domadenik & Dasa Farcnik, 2011. "Did Bologna reform improve school-to-work transition of graduates? Evidence from Slovenia," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 6, Asociación de Economía de la Educación, in: Antonio Caparrós Ruiz (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 6, edition 1, volume 6, chapter 40, pages 649-665 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
  11. Fujii, Mayu & Shiraishi, Kousuke & Takayama, Noriyuki, 2013. "The Determinants and Effects of Early Job Separation in Japan," CIS Discussion paper series, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University 590, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  12. Genda, Yuji, 2011. "Where does non-regular employment go? Some evidences from Japan," PIE/CIS Discussion Paper, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University 507, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  13. Setsuya Fukuda, 2009. "Shifting economic foundation of marriage in Japan: the erosion of traditional marriage," MPIDR Working Papers, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany WP-2009-033, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.

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