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The evolution of health outcomes from childhood to adolescence

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  • Contoyannis, Paul
  • Li, Jinhu

Abstract

Using data from the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY), this study examines how and why health outcomes exhibit persistence during the period from childhood to adolescence. We examine the distribution of health outcomes and health transitions using descriptive analysis and explore the determinants of these distributions by estimating the contributions of family SES, unobserved heterogeneity and state dependence and also allowing for heterogeneity of state dependence parameters across categories of neighborhood status. Our analysis indicates that children living in poorer neighborhoods, in neighborhoods with lower education levels and in neighborhoods with more families headed by lone-parents tend to experience poor health status for longer after a transition to it, while children tend to experience multiple health drops living in poorer neighborhoods, in neighborhoods with less educated people, in neighborhoods with more families headed by lone-parents and in neighborhoods with more families living in rental accommodation.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 30 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 11-32

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:30:y:2011:i:1:p:11-32

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505560

Related research

Keywords: Child health Health dynamics Canadian panel data Neighborhood effects;

References

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  1. Manuel Arellano & Jinyong Hahn, 2005. "Understanding Bias In Nonlinear Panel Models: Some Recent Developments," Working Papers wp2005_0507, CEMFI.
  2. van Doorslaer, Eddy & Wagstaff, Adam & van der Burg, Hattem & Christiansen, Terkel & De Graeve, Diana & Duchesne, Inge & Gerdtham, Ulf-G & Gerfin, Michael & Geurts, Jose & Gross, Lorna, 2000. "Equity in the delivery of health care in Europe and the US," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(5), pages 553-583, September.
  3. Crossley, Thomas F. & Kennedy, Steven, 2002. "The reliability of self-assessed health status," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 643-658, July.
  4. Paul Contoyannis & Martin Dooley, 2009. "The Role of Child Health and Economic Status in Educational, Health and Labour Market Outcomes in Young Adulthood," Department of Economics Working Papers 2009-10, McMaster University.
  5. Anne Case & Angela Fertig & Christina Paxson, 2004. "The Lasting Impact of Childhood Health and Circumstance," Working Papers 246, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Health and Wellbeing..
  6. Anne Case & Darren Lubotsky & Christina Paxson, 2002. "Economic Status and Health in Childhood: The Origins of the Gradient," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(5), pages 1308-1334, December.
  7. Martin Dooley & Jennifer Stewart, 2004. "Family income and child outcomes in Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 37(4), pages 898-917, November.
  8. Jeffrey M Wooldridge, 2002. "Simple solutions to the initial conditions problem in dynamic, nonlinear panel data models with unobserved heterogeneity," CeMMAP working papers CWP18/02, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
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  11. Neil J. Buckley & Frank T. Denton & A. Leslie Robb & Byron G. Spencer, 2003. "The Transition from Good to Poor Health: An Econometric Study of the Older Population," Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population Research Reports 381, McMaster University.
  12. Paul Contoyannis & Andrew M. Jones & Nigel Rice, 2002. "Simulation-based Inference in Dynamic Panel Probit Models: an Application to Health," Department of Economics Working Papers 2002-12, McMaster University.
  13. Ford, Graeme & Ecob, Russell & Hunt, Kate & Macintyre, Sally & West, Patrick, 1994. "Patterns of class inequality in health through the lifespan: Class gradients at 15, 35 and 55 years in the west of Scotland," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 39(8), pages 1037-1050, October.
  14. Paul Contoyannis & Andrew M. Jones & Nigel Rice, 2004. "The dynamics of health in the British Household Panel Survey," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(4), pages 473-503.
  15. Michael Baker & Mark Stabile & Catherine Deri, 2004. "What Do Self-Reported, Objective, Measures of Health Measure?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(4).
  16. Carro, Jesus M., 2007. "Estimating dynamic panel data discrete choice models with fixed effects," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 140(2), pages 503-528, October.
  17. Manuel Arellano, 2003. "Discrete choices with panel data," Investigaciones Economicas, Fundación SEPI, vol. 27(3), pages 423-458, September.
  18. Currie, Janet, 2000. "Child health in developed countries," Handbook of Health Economics, in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 19, pages 1053-1090 Elsevier.
  19. Lori J. Curtis & Martin D. Dooley & Ellen L. Lipman & David H. Feeny, 2001. "The role of permanent income and family structure in the determination of child health in Canada," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(4), pages 287-302.
  20. Katharina Hauck & Nigel Rice, 2004. "A longitudinal analysis of mental health mobility in Britain," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(10), pages 981-1001.
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Cited by:
  1. Cubi-Molla, P. & Jofre-Bonet, M. & Serra-Sastre, V., 2013. "Adaptation to Health States: A Micro-Econometric Approach," Working Papers 13/02, Department of Economics, City University London.

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