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The economics of intense exercise

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Author Info

  • Meltzer, David O.
  • Jena, Anupam B.

Abstract

Despite the well-known benefits of exercise, the time required for exercise is widely understood as a major reason for low levels of exercise in the US. Intensity of exercise can change the time required for a given amount of total exercise but has never been studied from an economic perspective. We present a simple model of exercise behavior which suggests that the intensity of exercise should increase relative to time spent exercising as wages increase, holding other determinants of exercise constant. Our empirical results identify an association between income and exercise intensity that is consistent with the hypothesis that people respond to increased time costs of exercise by increasing intensity. More generally, our results suggest that time costs may be an important determinant of exercise patterns and that factors that can influence the time costs of exercise, such as intensity, may be important concerns in designing interventions to promote exercise.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 29 (2010)
Issue (Month): 3 (May)
Pages: 347-352

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:29:y:2010:i:3:p:347-352

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505560

Related research

Keywords: Exercise Intensity Economics Health promotion;

References

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  1. Grossman, Michael, 1972. "On the Concept of Health Capital and the Demand for Health," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(2), pages 223-55, March-Apr.
  2. David Cutler & Edward Glaeser & Jesse Shapiro, 2003. "Why Have Americans Become More Obese?," NBER Working Papers 9446, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Chou, Shin-Yi & Grossman, Michael & Saffer, Henry, 2004. "An economic analysis of adult obesity: results from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 565-587, May.
  4. Shapiro, Jesse & Glaeser, Edward & Cutler, David, 2003. "Why Have Americans Become More Obese," Scholarly Articles 2640583, Harvard University Department of Economics.
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Citations

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Links 1/03/2011
    by Liam Delaney in Geary Behaviour Centre on 2011-03-01 15:54:00
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Cited by:
  1. Lechner, Michael & Downward, Paul, 2013. "Heterogeneous sports participation and labour market outcomes in England," Economics Working Paper Series 1323, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
  2. Lechner, Michael & Sari, Nazmi, 2014. "Labor market effects of sports and exercise: Evidence from Canadian panel data," CEPR Discussion Papers 9851, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Virpi Kuvaja-Köllner & Hannu Valtonen & Pirjo Komulainen & Maija Hassinen & Rainer Rauramaa, 2013. "The impact of time cost of physical exercise on health outcomes by older adults: the DR’s EXTRA Study," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 471-479, June.
  4. Finke, Michael S. & Huston, Sandra J., 2013. "Time preference and the importance of saving for retirement," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 23-34.
  5. Murakami, Keiko & Hashimoto, Hideki & Lee, Jung Su & Kawakubo, Kiyoshi & Mori, Katsumi & Akabayashi, Akira, 2011. "Distinct impact of education and income on habitual exercise: A cross-sectional analysis in a rural city in Japan," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(12), pages 1683-1688.
  6. Hyytinen, Ari & Lahtonen, Jukka, 2013. "The effect of physical activity on long-term income," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 129-137.

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