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Health care expenditure and GDP: panel data unit root test results--comment

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  • Hansen, Paul
  • King, Alan
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Health Economics.

    Volume (Year): 17 (1998)
    Issue (Month): 3 (June)
    Pages: 377-381

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:17:y:1998:i:3:p:377-381

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505560

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    Cited by:
    1. Potrafke, Niklas, 2012. "Political cycles and economic performance in OECD countries: Empirical evidence from 1951-2006," Munich Reprints in Economics 19272, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    2. Gurgul, Henryk & Lach, Lukasz & Mestel, Roland, 2011. "The relationship between budgetary expenditure and economic growth in Poland," MPRA Paper 35784, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Westerlund, Joakim, 2006. "Testing for Error Correction in Panel Data," Research Memorandum 056, Maastricht University, Maastricht Research School of Economics of Technology and Organization (METEOR).
    4. Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Lothgren, Mickael, 2000. "On stationarity and cointegration of international health expenditure and GDP," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 461-475, July.
    5. Potrafke, Niklas, 2010. "The growth of public health expenditures in OECD countries: Do government ideology and electoral motives matter?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 797-810, December.
    6. Jochen Hartwig, 2006. "What Drives Health Care Expenditure? Baumol’s Model of ‘Unbalanced Growth’ Revisited," KOF Working papers 06-133, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
    7. Kittel, Bernhard & Obinger, Herbert, 2002. "Political parties, institutions, and the dynamics of social expenditure in times of austerity," MPIfG Discussion Paper 02/1, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.
    8. Jewell, Todd & Lee, Junsoo & Tieslau, Margie & Strazicich, Mark C., 2003. "Stationarity of health expenditures and GDP: evidence from panel unit root tests with heterogeneous structural breaks," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 313-323, March.
    9. Helmut Herwartz & Bernd Theilen, 2003. "The determinants of health care expenditure: testing pooling restrictions in small samples," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(2), pages 113-124.
    10. Silvia Fedeli, 2012. "The impact of GDP on health care expenditure: the case of Italy (1982-2009)," Working Papers 153, University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Public Economics.
    11. Joakim Westerlund, 2007. "Testing for Error Correction in Panel Data," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 69(6), pages 709-748, December.
    12. Miller, Richard D. & Frech, Ted, 2002. "The Productivity of Health Care and Pharmaceuticals: Quality of Life, Cause," University of California at Santa Barbara, Economics Working Paper Series qt4b55f1xp, Department of Economics, UC Santa Barbara.
    13. Gurgul, Henryk & Lach, Łukasz, 2011. "Causality analysis between public expenditure and economic growth of Polish economy in last decade," MPRA Paper 52281, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Pemasiri J Gunawardana & Ramya Hewarathna, 2000. "The Asian Crisis and Australia-East Asia Trade Flows: A Modified Gravity Approach," Working Papers 2000.13, School of Economics, La Trobe University.
    15. Yen-ju Lin & Chun-chih Chen, 2012. "Eating Behavior and the Utilization of Outpatient Services - The Case of Taiwan," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(3), pages 2181-2197.
    16. Jennifer Roberts, 1999. "Sensitivity of elasticity estimates for OECD health care spending: analysis of a dynamic heterogeneous data field," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(5), pages 459-472.

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