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Economic and health effects of fruit and vegetable advertising: Evidence from lab experiments

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  • Liaukonyte, Jura
  • Rickard, Bradley J.
  • Kaiser, Harry M.
  • Okrent, Abigail M.
  • Richards, Timothy J.

Abstract

This study investigates consumer response to various types of advertising for fruits and vegetables—a food category which health officials uniformly agree is significantly under-consumed in the United States. Using an adult, non-student subject pool of 271 participants in an economic experiment, consumers’ response to different types of fruit and vegetable advertising is measured empirically. This study finds that broad-based advertising, which is generic advertising for the entire fruit and vegetable category, increases consumer willingness to pay by an average of 24.6%. The simulation model shows that broad-based advertising for fruits and vegetables, either alone or as a hybrid with individual commodity-specific campaigns (e.g., apple advertising), would reduce average caloric intake per person by approximately 1800kcal per year. The results of this study may contribute to new public policy initiatives that aim to reduce diet-related illnesses and obesity, which have become increasingly prevalent in the United States.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Food Policy.

Volume (Year): 37 (2012)
Issue (Month): 5 ()
Pages: 543-553

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:37:y:2012:i:5:p:543-553

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/foodpol

Related research

Keywords: Food marketing; Fruits and vegetables; Obesity; Health policy; Advertising;

References

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  1. Shapiro, Jesse & Glaeser, Edward & Cutler, David, 2003. "Why Have Americans Become More Obese," Scholarly Articles 2640583, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  2. Elyakime, Bernard & Laffont, Jean-Jacques & Loisel, Patrice & Vuong, Quang, 1993. "First-Price Sealed-Bid Auctions with Secret Reservation Prices," IDEI Working Papers 27, Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse.
  3. Harry M. Kaiser & Donald J. Liu & Ted Consignado, 2003. "An economic analysis of California raisin export promotion," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(2), pages 189-201.
  4. Okrent, Abigail M. & Alston, Julian M., 2011. "Demand for Food in the United States: A Review of Literature, Evaluation of Previous Estimates, and Presentation of New Estimates of Demand," Working Papers 162515, Robert Mondavi Institute Center for Wine Economics.
  5. Capacci, Sara & Mazzocchi, Mario, 2011. "Five-a-day, a price to pay: An evaluation of the UK program impact accounting for market forces," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 87-98, January.
  6. Bradley J. Rickard & Jura Liaukonyte & Harry M. Kaiser & Timothy J. Richards, 2011. "Consumer Response to Commodity-Specific and Broad-Based Promotion Programs for Fruits and Vegetables," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 93(5), pages 1312-1327.
  7. David Cutler & Edward Glaeser & Jesse Shapiro, 2003. "Why Have Americans Become More Obese?," NBER Working Papers 9446, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Carpio, Carlos E. & Isengildina-Massa, Olga, 2010. "To Fund or Not to Fund: Assessment of the Potential Impact of a Regional Promotion Campaign," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 35(2), August.
  9. Huang, Kuo S. & Lin, Biing-Hwan, 2000. "Estimation Of Food Demand And Nutrient Elasticities From Household Survey Data," Technical Bulletins 33579, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  10. Jayson L. Lusk & Darren Hudson, 2004. "Willingness-to-Pay Estimates and Their Relevance to Agribusiness Decision Making," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 26(2), pages 152-169.
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Cited by:
  1. Rusmevichientong, Pimbucha & Streletskaya, Nadia A. & Amatyakul, Wansopin & Kaiser, Harry M., 2014. "The impact of food advertisements on changing eating behaviors: An experimental study," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 59-67.

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