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The impact of a food security program on household food consumption in Northwestern Ethiopia: A matching estimator approach

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  • Abebaw, Degnet
  • Fentie, Yibeltal
  • Kassa, Belay

Abstract

With the financial support from various development partners, Ethiopia has designed and implemented several programs to improve household food security. Yet, food insecurity is still a major challenge to several millions of people in the country and it is questionable whether the different food security programs implemented over the past years have been successful. Using a propensity score matching method to control for pre-intervention differences, this study examined the impact on household food calorie intake of an integrated food security program (IFSP), which had been implemented in Northwestern Ethiopia by two non-governmental organizations as a case study. The estimated results provide evidence that IFSP has a positive and statistically significant effect on food calorie intake. In particular, IFSP has raised physical food calorie intake by 30% among the beneficiary households. However, we also found that IFSP has differential impact depending on family size, landownership and gender of head of household. Overall, the paper provides evidence that supporting integrated food security programs is important to improve food security in rural areas.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Food Policy.

Volume (Year): 35 (2010)
Issue (Month): 4 (August)
Pages: 286-293

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:35:y:2010:i:4:p:286-293

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/foodpol

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Keywords: Food security Program evaluation Propensity score matching Ethiopia;

References

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  1. Wagstaff, Adam & Lindelow, Magnus & Jun, Gao & Ling, Xu & Juncheng, Qian, 2009. "Extending health insurance to the rural population: An impact evaluation of China's new cooperative medical scheme," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 1-19, January.
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  4. Jalan, Jyotsna & Ravallion, Martin, 2003. "Does piped water reduce diarrhea for children in rural India?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 112(1), pages 153-173, January.
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  11. Haddad, Lawrence & Bhattarai, Saroj & Immink, Maarten & Kumar, Shubh, 1998. "Estimating the interactions between household food security and preschool diarrhea," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(3-4), pages 241-261, November.
  12. Heckman, James J & Ichimura, Hidehiko & Todd, Petra E, 1997. "Matching as an Econometric Evaluation Estimator: Evidence from Evaluating a Job Training Programme," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(4), pages 605-54, October.
  13. Bernard, Tanguy & Gabre-Madhin, Eleni Z. & Taffesse, Alemayehu Seyoum, 2008. "Heterogeneous Impacts Of Cooperatives On Smallholders’ Commercialization Behavior: Evidence From Ethiopia," 2007 Second International Conference, August 20-22, 2007, Accra, Ghana 52161, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
  14. Shiferaw T. Feleke & Richard L. Kilmer & Christina H. Gladwin, 2005. "Determinants of food security in Southern Ethiopia at the household level," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 33(3), pages 351-363, November.
  15. Hope, R.A., 2007. "Evaluating Social Impacts of Watershed Development in India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(8), pages 1436-1449, August.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Pangaribowo, Evita Hanie, 2012. "The Impact of ‘Rice for the Poor’ on Household Consumption," 2012 Conference (56th), February 7-10, 2012, Freemantle, Australia 124358, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  2. Pangaribowo, Evita Hanie, 2012. "Heterogenous Impact of ‘Rice for the Poor’ Program in Indonesia," 86th Annual Conference, April 16-18, 2012, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 134755, Agricultural Economics Society.
  3. Cunguara, Benedito & Darnhofer, Ika, 2011. "Assessing the impact of improved agricultural technologies on household income in rural Mozambique," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 378-390, June.
  4. Bashir, Muhammad Khalid & Schilizzi, Steven, 2012. "Measuring food security: Definitional sensitivity and implications," 2012 Conference (56th), February 7-10, 2012, Freemantle, Australia 124227, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  5. Wanjala, Bernadette M. & Muradian, Roldan, 2013. "Can Big Push Interventions Take Small-Scale Farmers out of Poverty? Insights from the Sauri Millennium Village in Kenya," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 147-160.

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