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Estimating impact of cassava research for development approach on productivity, uptake and food security in Malawi

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Author Info

  • Rusike, J.
  • Mahungu, N.M.
  • Jumbo, S.
  • Sandifolo, V.S.
  • Malindi, G.
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    Abstract

    Cassava in Malawi is the second most important staple food crop after maize. This paper assesses the impact of agricultural research for development approach in Malawi on cassava yields, per capita area planted to cassava and household calorie intake from cassava and maize. Given the growing interest over the past decade in agricultural research for development as an innovation systems approach for improving the delivery of research-derived benefits to smallholder farmers and having impact in Africa, this paper provides empirical evidence as to the effects of this framework. The paper concludes that Malawi's cassava research for development has contributed to measurable gains in area planted to cassava, cassava yields and household caloric intake.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VCB-4XSKCPP-1/2/fd5b5dae6ea8c0779ce1790045db6f84
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Food Policy.

    Volume (Year): 35 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 2 (April)
    Pages: 98-111

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:35:y:2010:i:2:p:98-111

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/foodpol

    Related research

    Keywords: Cassava research for development approach Treatment effects Impact pathway Malawi;

    References

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    1. James J. Heckman & Vytlacil, Edward J., 2007. "Econometric Evaluation of Social Programs, Part I: Causal Models, Structural Models and Econometric Policy Evaluation," Handbook of Econometrics, in: J.J. Heckman & E.E. Leamer (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 6, chapter 70 Elsevier.
    2. Esther Duflo & Rachel Glennerster & Michael Kremer, 2006. "Using Randomization in Development Economics Research: A Toolkit," NBER Technical Working Papers 0333, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. James Heckman & Salvador Navarro-Lozano, 2004. "Using Matching, Instrumental Variables, and Control Functions to Estimate Economic Choice Models," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(1), pages 30-57, February.
    4. Wooldridge, Jeffrey M. & Imbens, Guido, 2009. "Recent Developments in the Econometrics of Program Evaluation," Scholarly Articles 3043416, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    5. Heckman, J J & Tobias, Justin & Vytlacil, Ed, 2001. "Four Parameters of Interest in the Evaluation of Social Programs," Staff General Research Papers 12022, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    6. Richard Blundell & Monica Costa Dias, 2008. "Alternative approaches to evaluation in empirical microeconomics," CeMMAP working papers CWP26/08, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    7. Alberto Abadie & David Drukker & Jane Leber Herr & Guido W. Imbens, 2004. "Implementing matching estimators for average treatment effects in Stata," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 4(3), pages 290-311, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:
    1. Kabunga, Nassul Ssentamu & Ghosh, Shibani & Griffiths, Jeffrey K., 2014. "Can smallholder fruit and vegetable production systems improve household food security and nutritional status of women? Evidence from rural Uganda:," IFPRI discussion papers 1346, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Kabunga, Nassul S. & Dubois, Thomas & Qaim, Matin, 2014. "Impact of tissue culture banana technology on farm household income and food security in Kenya," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 25-34.
    3. Renkow, Mitch & Byerlee, Derek, 2010. "The impacts of CGIAR research: A review of recent evidence," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 391-402, October.

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