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Networks and productivity: Causal evidence from editor rotations

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  • Brogaard, Jonathan
  • Engelberg, Joseph
  • Parsons, Christopher A.
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    Abstract

    Using detailed publication and citation data for over 50,000 articles from 30 major economics and finance journals, we investigate whether network proximity to an editor influences research productivity. During an editor's tenure, his current university colleagues publish about 100% more papers in the editor's journal, compared to years when he is not editor. In contrast to editorial nepotism, such “inside” articles have significantly higher ex post citation counts, even when same-journal and self-cites are excluded. Our results thus suggest that despite potential conflicts of interest faced by editors, personal associations are used to improve selection decisions.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304405X13002687
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Financial Economics.

    Volume (Year): 111 (2014)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 251-270

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jfinec:v:111:y:2014:i:1:p:251-270

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505576

    Related research

    Keywords: Editor networks; Citations;

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    9. Patrick Bayer & Stephen L. Ross, 2004. "Place of Work and Place of Residence: Informal Hiring Networks and Labor Market Outcomes," Econometric Society 2004 North American Summer Meetings 495, Econometric Society.
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