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How do individuals deal with victimization and victimization risk? Longitudinal evidence from Mexico

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Author Info

  • Braakmann, Nils

Abstract

This paper uses variation in victimization probabilities and past victimization between individuals living in the same community to shed new light on the costs of crime. I use panel data from the Mexican Family Life Survey for 2002 and 2005 and look at the impact of within-community differences in victimization risk on changes in (avoidance) behavior and time-allocation. My results from fixed effects and instrumental variable estimations point towards a number of behavioral changes, including individuals arming themselves, with marked gender differences in the reactions of individuals. Crime victims also suffer from sleep deprivation indicating welfare losses.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

Volume (Year): 84 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 335-344

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:84:y:2012:i:1:p:335-344

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jebo

Related research

Keywords: Cost of crime; Victimization; Avoidance behavior; Dwelling protection;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Janke, Katharina & Propper, Carol & Shields, Michael A., 2013. "Does Violent Crime Deter Physical Activity?," IZA Discussion Papers 7545, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Katharina Janke & Carol Propper & Michael Shields, 2013. "Does Violent Crime Deter Physical Activity?," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 13/312, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  3. Braakmann, Nils, 2012. "The link between non-property crime and house prices – Evidence from UK street-level data," MPRA Paper 44884, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Braakmann, Nils, 2013. "Crime, health and wellbeing – Longitudinal evidence from Mexico," MPRA Paper 44885, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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