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Testing for discrimination: Evidence from the game show Street Smarts

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  • Anwar, Shamena
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    Abstract

    This paper conducts two alternative tests of discrimination in the game show Street Smarts, which both exploit the unique setup of the game to determine why discrimination occurs. The results indicate non-black contestants have a lower prior perception of the skill level of blacks relative to non-blacks in answering the average question in the game. When results are stratified by question category, one finds that non-black contestants perceive blacks and non-blacks to have equal ability in answering general knowledge questions. However, they perceive blacks to have a lower ability in answering miscellaneous, entertainment, and slang/common saying questions.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

    Volume (Year): 81 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 268-285

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:81:y:2012:i:1:p:268-285

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jebo

    Related research

    Keywords: Statistical discrimination; Racial prejudice; Inaccurate stereotypes;

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    Cited by:
    1. David Schüller & Thorsten Upmann, 2013. "When Focal Points are Out of Focus: A Game-Theoretic Analysis of Come Dine with Me," CESifo Working Paper Series 4138, CESifo Group Munich.

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