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Naming your own price mechanisms: Revenue gain or drain?

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  • Shapiro, Dmitry
  • Zillante, Arthur

Abstract

We experimentally study the profitability of pricing mechanisms that allow customers to quote their own prices, such as Priceline.com's "Name-Your-Own-Price" (NYOP). Presumably firms find this sales method profit-maximizing despite the concerns that NYOP websites can cannibalize profit from standard distribution channels. Using a laboratory experiment we compare outcomes between NYOP and posted-price settings. We find that NYOP mechanisms that do not conceal information about products increase profit and consumer surplus. When NYOP channels conceal information about products there is no significant change in profit unless the threshold above which bids are accepted is set near marginal cost, whereby profit decreases.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

Volume (Year): 72 (2009)
Issue (Month): 2 (November)
Pages: 725-737

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:72:y:2009:i:2:p:725-737

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Related research

Keywords: Name-Your-Own-Price mechanism Priceline Reverse pricing Laboratory experiment;

References

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  1. Tuo Wang & Esther Gal-Or & Rabikar Chatterjee, 2009. "The Name-Your-Own-Price Channel in the Travel Industry: An Analytical Exploration," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 55(6), pages 968-979, June.
  2. Dmitry Shapiro & Xianwen Shi, 2008. "Market Segmentation: The Role of Opaque Travel Agencies," Working Papers tecipa-310, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
  3. Scott Fay, 2004. "Partial-Repeat-Bidding in the Name-Your-Own-Price Channel," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 23(3), pages 407-418, February.
  4. Ulrike Malmendier & Young Han Lee, 2011. "The Bidder's Curse," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(2), pages 749-87, April.
  5. Kahneman, Daniel & Tversky, Amos, 1979. "Prospect Theory: An Analysis of Decision under Risk," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(2), pages 263-91, March.
  6. McFadden, Daniel L., 2000. "Economic Choices," Nobel Prize in Economics documents 2000-6, Nobel Prize Committee.
  7. Riley, John & Zeckhauser, Richard, 1983. "Optimal Selling Strategies: When to Haggle, When to Hold Firm," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 98(2), pages 267-89, May.
  8. Christian Terwiesch & Sergei Savin & Il-Horn Hann, 2005. "Online Haggling at a Name-Your-Own-Price Retailer: Theory and Application," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 51(3), pages 339-351, March.
  9. Maskin, Eric S & Riley, John G, 1984. "Optimal Auctions with Risk Averse Buyers," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(6), pages 1473-1518, November.
  10. Ruqu Wang, 1991. "Auctions Versus Posted-Price Selling," Working Papers 812, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  11. Urs Fischbacher, 2007. "z-Tree: Zurich toolbox for ready-made economic experiments," Experimental Economics, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 171-178, June.
  12. Dan Ariely & George Loewenstein & Drazen Prelec, 2003. ""Coherent Arbitrariness": Stable Demand Curves Without Stable Preferences," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 118(1), pages 73-105, February.
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Cited by:
  1. Huang, Ching-I & Chen, Jong-Rong & Lee, Chiu-Yu, 2013. "Buyer behavior under the Best Offer mechanism: A theoretical model and empirical evidence from eBay Motors," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 11-33.
  2. Malgorzata Ogonowska & Dominique Torre, 2010. "Joint Opaque booking systems for online travel agencies," Working Papers hal-00476150, HAL.

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