Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Markets come to bits: Evolution, computation and markomata in economic science

Contents:

Author Info

  • Mirowski, Philip
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    No abstract is available for this item.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V8F-4MRFC3R-3/2/ea5572d1b148e9aeda3c0ab502754662
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

    Volume (Year): 63 (2007)
    Issue (Month): 2 (June)
    Pages: 209-242

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:63:y:2007:i:2:p:209-242

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jebo

    Related research

    Keywords:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Leonid Hurwicz, 1994. "Economic design, adjustment processes, mechanisms, and institutions," Review of Economic Design, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 1-14, December.
    2. Miller, Ross M., 1996. "Smart market mechanisms: From practice to theory," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 20(6-7), pages 967-978.
    3. Jan Pieter Krahnen & Martin Weber, 2001. "Marketmaking in the Laboratory: Does Competition Matter?," Working Paper Series: Finance and Accounting 4, Department of Finance, Goethe University Frankfurt am Main.
    4. Madhavan, Ananth, 2000. "Market microstructure: A survey," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 3(3), pages 205-258, August.
    5. J. Barkley Rosser, 1999. "On the Complexities of Complex Economic Dynamics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(4), pages 169-192, Fall.
    6. Ames, Edward, 1983. "Automation and group structures in certain economic adjustment mechanisms," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 6(2), pages 247-260, November.
    7. Gode, Dhananjay K & Sunder, Shyam, 1993. "Allocative Efficiency of Markets with Zero-Intelligence Traders: Market as a Partial Substitute for Individual Rationality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(1), pages 119-37, February.
    8. John Rust, 1996. "Dealing with the Complexity of Economic Calculations," Computational Economics 9610002, EconWPA, revised 21 Oct 1997.
    9. Domowitz, Ian, 1993. "A taxonomy of automated trade execution systems," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 12(6), pages 607-631, December.
    10. Domowitz, Ian & Wang, Jianxin, 1994. "Auctions as algorithms : Computerized trade execution and price discovery," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 29-60, January.
    11. Wurman, Peter R. & Wellman, Michael P. & Walsh, William E., 2001. "A Parametrization of the Auction Design Space," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 35(1-2), pages 304-338, April.
    12. Admati, Anat R., 1991. "The informational role of prices : A review essay," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 347-361, October.
    13. Mount,Kenneth R. & Reiter,Stanley, 2002. "Computation and Complexity in Economic Behavior and Organization," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521800563, April.
    14. Reiter, Stanley, 1977. "Information and Performance in the (New)2 Welfare Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(1), pages 226-34, February.
    15. Kislaya Prasad, 2004. "Constructive and Classical Models for Results in Economics and Game Theory," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(2-3), pages 141-154, 05.
    16. repec:wop:humbsf:2000-72 is not listed on IDEAS
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Kurt Dopfer, 2013. "Evolutionary Economics," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2013-08, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    2. Stan Palasek, 2014. "Arbitrage-free exchange rate ensembles over a general trade network," Papers 1406.1547, arXiv.org.
    3. Richard Holt & J. Barkley Rosser & David Colander, 2011. "The Complexity Era in Economics," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(3), pages 357-369.
    4. Rosser Jr., J. Barkley, 2010. "Is a transdisciplinary perspective on economic complexity possible?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 75(1), pages 3-11, July.
    5. Koppl, Roger, 2010. "Some epistemological implications of economic complexity," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 76(3), pages 859-872, December.
    6. Nannen, Volker & van den Bergh, Jeroen C. J. M. & Eiben, A. E., 2008. "Impact of Environmental Dynamics on Economic Evolution: Uncertainty, Risk Aversion, and Policy," MPRA Paper 13834, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Marco LiCalzi & Lucia Milone & Paolo Pellizzari, 2008. "Allocative efficiency and traders' protection under zero intelligence behavior," Working Papers 168, Department of Applied Mathematics, Università Ca' Foscari Venezia, revised Nov 2009.
    8. Dan Farhat, 2012. "Artificial Neural Networks and Aggregate Consumption Patterns in New Zealand," Working Papers 1205, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Dec 2012.
    9. Jason Potts, 2007. "Exchange and evolution," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 123-135, September.
    10. Chen, Shu-Heng, 2012. "Varieties of agents in agent-based computational economics: A historical and an interdisciplinary perspective," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 1-25.
    11. Daniel Farhat, 2014. "Information Processing, Pattern Transmission and Aggregate Consumption Patterns in New Zealand," Working Papers 1405, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Mar 2014.
    12. Rosser, J. Barkley, 2012. "Emergence and complexity in Austrian economics," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 122-128.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:63:y:2007:i:2:p:209-242. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.