Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Emerging market crises and US equity market returns

Contents:

Author Info

  • Berger, Dave
  • Turtle, H.J.
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    We find contagion effects are present in US small size portfolios during emerging market crises due to risk and liquidity concerns. Investors display flight from risk during emerging market crises, and as a result, safer larger stocks exhibit positive abnormal returns. We find little evidence of contagion in aggregate excess US market returns, indicating studies that focus on national aggregates may miss important within market dynamics during emerging market crises. The international dynamics that we document have important implications for investors, even when they may have limited global exposure.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1044028311000056
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Global Finance Journal.

    Volume (Year): 22 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 32-41

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:eee:glofin:v:22:y:2011:i:1:p:32-41

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/620162

    Related research

    Keywords: Contagion Financial crises Asset-pricing;

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Yang, Jian & Bessler, David A., 2008. "Contagion around the October 1987 stock market crash," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 184(1), pages 291-310, January.
    2. T. Todd Smith & Garry J. Schinasi, 1999. "Portfolio Diversification, Leverage, and Financial Contagion," IMF Working Papers 99/136, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Alon Brav & Reuven Lehavy & Roni Michaely, 2005. "Using Expectations to Test Asset Pricing Models," Financial Management, Financial Management Association, vol. 34(3), Fall.
    4. Liu, Weimin, 2006. "A liquidity-augmented capital asset pricing model," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(3), pages 631-671, December.
    5. Maroney, Neal & Naka, Atsuyuki & Wansi, Theresia, 2004. "Changing Risk, Return, and Leverage: The 1997 Asian Financial Crisis," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 39(01), pages 143-166, March.
    6. Kristin J. Forbes & Roberto Rigobon, 2002. "No Contagion, Only Interdependence: Measuring Stock Market Comovements," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 57(5), pages 2223-2261, October.
    7. Jha, Ranjini & Korkie, Bob & Turtle, Harry J., 2009. "Measuring performance in a dynamic world: Conditional mean-variance fundamentals," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 1851-1859, October.
    8. John Y. Campbell & John H. Cochrane, 1995. "By Force of Habit: A Consumption-Based Explanation of Aggregate Stock Market Behavior," NBER Working Papers 4995, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Fernando Broner & Gaston Gelos & Carmen Reinhart, 2004. "When in peril, retrench: testing the portfolio channel of contagion," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Jun.
    10. Sivagowry Sriananthakumar & Param Silvapulle, 2008. "Multivariate conditional heteroscedasticity models with dynamic correlations for testing contagion," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(4), pages 267-273.
    11. Ferson, Wayne E & Schadt, Rudi W, 1996. " Measuring Fund Strategy and Performance in Changing Economic Conditions," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 51(2), pages 425-61, June.
    12. Fazio, Giorgio, 2007. "Extreme interdependence and extreme contagion between emerging markets," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 26(8), pages 1261-1291, December.
    13. Geert Bekaert & Campbell R. Harvey, 2003. "Market Integration and Contagion," NBER Working Papers 9510, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Carrieri, Francesca & Errunza, Vihang & Hogan, Ked, 2007. "Characterizing World Market Integration through Time," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 42(04), pages 915-940, December.
    15. Albert S. Kyle, 2001. "Contagion as a Wealth Effect," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(4), pages 1401-1440, 08.
    16. Fama, Eugene F & French, Kenneth R, 1992. " The Cross-Section of Expected Stock Returns," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 47(2), pages 427-65, June.
    17. Daryl Collins & Shana Gavron, 2004. "Channels of financial market contagion," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(21), pages 2461-2469.
    18. Baek, In-Mee & Bandopadhyaya, Arindam & Du, Chan, 2005. "Determinants of market-assessed sovereign risk: Economic fundamentals or market risk appetite?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 533-548, June.
    19. Laura E. Kodres & Matthew Pritsker, 2002. "A Rational Expectations Model of Financial Contagion," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 57(2), pages 769-799, 04.
    20. Bayoumi, Tamim & Fazio, Giorgio & Kumar, Manmohan & MacDonald, Ronald, 2007. "Fatal attraction: Using distance to measure contagion in good times as well as bad," Review of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 259-273.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Gębka, Bartosz & Wohar, Mark E., 2013. "International herding: Does it differ across sectors?," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 55-84.
    2. Lee, Yen-Hsien & Tucker, Alan L. & Wang, David K. & Pao, Hsin-Ting, 2014. "Global contagion of market sentiment during the US subprime crisis," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 17-26.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:glofin:v:22:y:2011:i:1:p:32-41. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.