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Threshold effect of the economic growth rate on the renewable energy development from a change in energy price: Evidence from OECD countries

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  • Chang, Ting-Huan
  • Huang, Chien-Ming
  • Lee, Ming-Chih
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    Abstract

    This paper uses a panel threshold regression (PTR) model to investigate the influence that energy prices have on renewable energy development under different economic growth rate regimes. The empirical data are obtained from each of the OECD member-countries over the period from 1997 to 2006. We show that there is one threshold in the regression relationship, which is 4.13% of a one-period lag in the annual gross domestic product (GDP) growth rate. The consumer price index (CPI), in so far as it relates to variations in energy, is significantly positively correlated with the contribution of renewables to energy supply in the regime with higher-economic growth, but there is no relationship in the regime with lower economic growth. Therefore, countries characterized by high-economic growth are able to respond to high energy prices with increases in renewable energy use, while countries characterized by low-economic growth countries tend to be unresponsive to energy price changes when they come to their level of renewable energy.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Policy.

    Volume (Year): 37 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 12 (December)
    Pages: 5796-5802

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:37:y:2009:i:12:p:5796-5802

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enpol

    Related research

    Keywords: Renewable energy Economic growth Threshold effect;

    References

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    1. Shimon Awerbuch & Raphael Sauter, 2005. "Exploiting the Oil-GDP Effect to Support Renewables Deployment," SPRU Working Paper Series 129, SPRU - Science and Technology Policy Research, University of Sussex.
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    8. Askari, Hossein & Krichene, Noureddine, 2008. "Oil price dynamics (2002-2006)," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 2134-2153, September.
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    Cited by:
    1. Liu, Yaobin, 2014. "Is the natural resource production a blessing or curse for China's urbanization? Evidence from a space–time panel data model," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 404-416.
    2. Susana Silva & Isabel Soares & Carlos Pinho, 2011. "The impact of renewable energy sources on economic growth and CO2 emissions - a SVAR approach," FEP Working Papers 407, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    3. Fang, Yiping, 2011. "Economic welfare impacts from renewable energy consumption: The China experience," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 15(9), pages 5120-5128.
    4. Aviral Kumar Tiwari, 2011. "A structural VAR analysis of renewable energy consumption, real GDP and CO2 emissions: Evidence from India," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(2), pages 1793-1806.
    5. Halkos, George & Tzeremes, Nickolaos, 2013. "Renewable energy consumption and economic efficiency: Evidence from European countries," MPRA Paper 44136, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Shahbaz, Muhammad & Zeshan, Muhammad & Afza, Talat, 2012. "Is energy consumption effective to spur economic growth in Pakistan? New evidence from bounds test to level relationships and Granger causality tests," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 2310-2319.
    7. António Marques & José Fuinhas & José Manso, 2011. "A Quantile Approach to Identify Factors Promoting Renewable Energy in European Countries," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 49(3), pages 351-366, July.
    8. Halkos, George & Tzeremes, Nickolaos, 2013. "The effect of electricity consumption from renewable sources on countries’ economic growth levels: Evidence from advanced, emerging and developing economies," MPRA Paper 50630, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Marques, António Cardoso & Fuinhas, José Alberto, 2011. "Drivers promoting renewable energy: A dynamic panel approach," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 1601-1608, April.
    10. Aravindhakshan, Sijesh C. & Koo, Won W., 2011. "Energy, Agriculture, and GHG Emissions: The Role of Agriculture in Alternative Energy Production and GHG Emission Reduction in North Dakota," Agribusiness & Applied Economics Report 101222, North Dakota State University, Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics.
    11. Marques, António C. & Fuinhas, José A. & Pires Manso, J.R., 2010. "Motivations driving renewable energy in European countries: A panel data approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(11), pages 6877-6885, November.
    12. Omri, Anis & Kahouli, Bassem, 2014. "Causal relationships between energy consumption, foreign direct investment and economic growth: Fresh evidence from dynamic simultaneous-equations models," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 913-922.

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