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Income, resources, and electricity mix

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  • Burke, Paul J.

Abstract

This paper presents evidence on a national-level electricity ladder which sees countries transition toward coal and natural gas, and finally nuclear power and modern renewables such as wind power, for their electricity needs as they develop. The extent to which countries climb the electricity ladder is dependent on energy endowments. The results imply that the environmental implications of economic development differ in countries with different energy resource endowments. An effective global carbon mitigation strategy will require developing countries to leapfrog the middle rungs of the electricity ladder.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Economics.

Volume (Year): 32 (2010)
Issue (Month): 3 (May)
Pages: 616-626

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Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:32:y:2010:i:3:p:616-626

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/eneco

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Keywords: Economic development Electricity mix Energy Substitution Transition;

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References

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  2. Pesaran, M.H. & Smith, R., 1992. "Estimating Long-Run Relationships From Dynamic Heterogeneous Panels," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 9215, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
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  5. Azomahou, Theophile & Laisney, Francois & Nguyen Van, Phu, 2006. "Economic development and CO2 emissions: A nonparametric panel approach," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(6-7), pages 1347-1363, August.
  6. Jeffrey D. Sachs & Andrew M. Warner, 1995. "Natural Resource Abundance and Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 5398, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Tahvonen, Olli & Salo, Seppo, 2001. "Economic growth and transitions between renewable and nonrenewable energy resources," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(8), pages 1379-1398, August.
  8. Heltberg, Rasmus, 2004. "Fuel switching: evidence from eight developing countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 869-887, September.
  9. World Bank, 2009. "World Development Indicators 2009," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 4367, August.
  10. Catherine Norman, 2009. "Rule of Law and the Resource Curse: Abundance Versus Intensity," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 43(2), pages 183-207, June.
  11. Elbert Dijkgraaf & Herman Vollebergh, 2005. "A Test for Parameter Homogeneity in CO 2Panel EKC Estimations," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 32(2), pages 229-239, October.
  12. Leach, Gerald, 1992. "The energy transition," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 116-123, February.
  13. Richard Schmalensee & Thomas M. Stoker & Ruth A. Judson, 1998. "World Carbon Dioxide Emissions: 1950-2050," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(1), pages 15-27, February.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Yamazaki, Satoshi & Tian, Jing & Tchatoka, Firmin Doko, 2013. "Are Per Capita CO2 Emissions Increasing Among OECD Countries? A Test of Trends and Breaks," Working Papers 17518, University of Tasmania, School of Economics and Finance, revised 29 Sep 2013.
  2. Burke, Paul J., 2013. "The national-level energy ladder and its carbon implications," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 18(04), pages 484-503, August.
  3. Zsuzsanna Csereklyei, 2013. "Measuring the Impacts of Nuclear Accidents on Energy Policy," Department of Economics Working Papers wuwp151, Vienna University of Economics, Department of Economics.
  4. Steckel, Jan Christoph & Brecha, Robert J. & Jakob, Michael & Strefler, Jessica & Luderer, Gunnar, 2013. "Development without energy? Assessing future scenarios of energy consumption in developing countries," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 53-67.
  5. David I. Stern, 2010. "The Role of Energy in Economic Growth," CCEP Working Papers 0310, Centre for Climate Economics & Policy, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  6. Zeba Anjum & Paul J. Burke & Reyer Gerlagh & David I. Stern, 2014. "Modeling the Emissions-Income Relationship Using Long-Run Growth Rates," CCEP Working Papers 1403, Centre for Climate Economics & Policy, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  7. Paul J Burke, 2011. "Climbing the electricity ladder generates carbon Kuznets curve downturns," CAMA Working Papers 2011-31, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  8. Jakob, Michael & Haller, Markus & Marschinski, Robert, 2012. "Will history repeat itself? Economic convergence and convergence in energy use patterns," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 95-104.
  9. Michael Smith & Johannes Urpelainen, 2014. "The Effect of Feed-in Tariffs on Renewable Electricity Generation: An Instrumental Variables Approach," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 57(3), pages 367-392, March.
  10. Menz, Tobias & Welsch, Heinz, 2012. "Population aging and carbon emissions in OECD countries: Accounting for life-cycle and cohort effects," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 842-849.
  11. Phetkeo Poumanyvong & Shinji Kaneko & Shobhakar Dhakal, 2012. "Impacts of urbanization on national residential energy use and CO2 emissions: Evidence from low-, middle- and high-income countries," IDEC DP2 Series 2-5, Hiroshima University, Graduate School for International Development and Cooperation (IDEC).
  12. Lee, Lisa Yu-Ting, 2013. "Household energy mix in Uganda," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 252-261.

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