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Birthweight outcomes in Bolivia: The role of maternal height, ethnicity, and behavior

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  • Delajara, Marcelo
  • Wendelspiess Chávez Juárez, Florian

Abstract

We identify maternal behavioral factors associated with birthweight in Bolivia using data from the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) of 2003. We estimate birthweight as a function of maternal behavior and the child's sex and gestational age. We control for maternal height, ethnicity, education, and wealth, and for differences observed across Bolivian regions in educational and health outcomes, demographic indicators, and altitude. We find that maternal age, fertility record, and birth spacing behavior are the main observable behavioral factors associated with birthweight, and that maternal height is associated with gestational age, a main determinant of birthweight. We also find that after controlling for gestational age, both ethnicity and altitude have an insignificant effect on birthweight.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics & Human Biology.

Volume (Year): 11 (2013)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 56-68

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:11:y:2013:i:1:p:56-68

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622964

Related research

Keywords: Birthweight; Health production function; Bolivia;

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References

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