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Influential listeners: An experiment on persuasion bias in social networks

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  • Corazzini, Luca
  • Pavesi, Filippo
  • Petrovich, Beatrice
  • Stanca, Luca

Abstract

This paper presents an experimental investigation of persuasion bias, a form of bounded rationality whereby agents communicating through a social network are unable to account for repetitions in the information they receive. We find that, after repeated communication within a social network, social influence depends not only on being listened to by many others, but also on listening to many others. We show that persuasion bias can be viewed as an extreme case of a generalized boundedly rational updating rule in which agents receive more or less attention depending on how many other agents they listen to. The results indicate that behavior in the experiment is consistent with an updating rule according to which agents' social influence is proportional to their indegree.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal European Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 56 (2012)
Issue (Month): 6 ()
Pages: 1276-1288

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Handle: RePEc:eee:eecrev:v:56:y:2012:i:6:p:1276-1288

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/eer

Related research

Keywords: Social networks; Learning; Social influence; Persuasion bias; Bounded rationality;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Benjamin Enke & Florian Zimmermann, 2013. "Correlation Neglect in Belief Formation," Bonn Econ Discussion Papers bgse04_2013, University of Bonn, Germany.
  2. Büchel, Berno & Hellmann, Tim & Klößner, Stefan, 2013. "Opinion Dynamics and Wisdom under Conformity," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79770, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  3. Pietro Battiston & Luca Stanca, 2014. "Boundedly Rational Opinion Dynamics in Directed Social Networks: Theory and Experimental Evidence," Working Papers 267, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2014.

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