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Output composition and the US output volatility decline

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  • Alcala, Francisco
  • Sancho, Israel

Abstract

We argue that the role played by output-composition changes on the decline in US output volatility has been incorrectly assessed in the recent literature. We obtain that shifts across broad sectors in the economy account for about thirty-percent of the volatility decline since the 1950’s.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 82 (2004)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 115-120

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:82:y:2004:i:1:p:115-120

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  1. Richard Clarida & Jordi Galí & Mark Gertler, 1997. "Monetary policy rules and macroeconomic stability: Evidence and some theory," Economics Working Papers 350, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised May 1999.
  2. Karl Whelan, 2000. "A guide to the use of chain aggregated NIPA data," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2000-35, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  3. James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 2002. "Has the Business Cycle Changed and Why?," NBER Working Papers 9127, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. James A. Kahn & Margaret M. McConnell & Gabriel Perez-Quiros, 2002. "On the causes of the increased stability of the U.S. economy," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue May, pages 183-202.
  5. Olivier Blanchard & John Simon, 2001. "The Long and Large Decline in U.S. Output Volatility," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 32(1), pages 135-174.
  6. Gabriel Perez-Quiros & Margaret M. McConnell, 2000. "Output Fluctuations in the United States: What Has Changed since the Early 1980's?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1464-1476, December.
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Cited by:
  1. Alessio Moro, 2009. "The structural transformation between manufacturing and services and the deline in the U.S. GDP volatility," Economics Working Papers we091409, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Economía.
  2. Selgin, George & Lastrapes, William D. & White, Lawrence H., 2012. "Has the Fed been a failure?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 569-596.
  3. Bivin, David, 2006. "Decomposing the contribution of smaller shocks to the stabilization of GDP," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 91(3), pages 444-449, June.
  4. Edward N. Gamber & Julie K. Smith & Matthew Weiss, 2008. "Forecast Errors Before and After the Great Moderation," Working Papers 2008-001, The George Washington University, Department of Economics, Research Program on Forecasting, revised Mar 2009.
  5. Silvia Sgherri, 2005. "Long-Run Productivity Shifts and Cyclical Fluctuations," IMF Working Papers 05/228, International Monetary Fund.

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