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Good news for experimenters: subjects do not care about your welfare

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  • Frank, Bjorn
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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V84-3V4JM4D-6/2/3d6ea627ae7028c9ca52b67ea431d0d1
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

    Volume (Year): 61 (1998)
    Issue (Month): 2 (November)
    Pages: 171-174

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:61:y:1998:i:2:p:171-174

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. Alvin E. Roth & V. Prasnikar & M. Okuno-Fujiwara & S. Zamir, 1998. "Bargaining and market behavior in Jerusalem, Liubljana, Pittsburgh and Tokyo: an experimental study," Levine's Working Paper Archive 344, David K. Levine.
    2. Bolton, Gary E, 1991. "A Comparative Model of Bargaining: Theory and Evidence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(5), pages 1096-136, December.
    3. Hennig-Schmidt, Heike, 1997. "Break-offs in Bargaining, Evidence from a Video Experiment," Discussion Paper Serie B 402, University of Bonn, Germany, revised May 1997.
    4. Bolton Gary E. & Zwick Rami, 1995. "Anonymity versus Punishment in Ultimatum Bargaining," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 95-121, July.
    5. John R. Carter & Michael D. Irons, 1991. "Are Economists Different, and If So, Why?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 5(2), pages 171-177, Spring.
    6. Bethwaite, Judy & Tompkinson, Paul, 1996. "The ultimatum game and non-selfish utility functions," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 259-271, April.
    7. Telser, L G, 1995. "The Ultimatum Game and the Law of Demand," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 105(433), pages 1519-23, November.
    8. Guth, Werner & Schmittberger, Rolf & Schwarze, Bernd, 1982. "An experimental analysis of ultimatum bargaining," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 367-388, December.
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    Cited by:
    1. Brañas Garza, Pablo & Espinosa Alejos, María Paz & Durán, Miguel A., 2005. "Do experimental subjects favor their friends?," DFAEII Working Papers 2005-12, University of the Basque Country - Department of Foundations of Economic Analysis II.
    2. Linardi, Sera & McConnell, Margaret A., 2011. "No excuses for good behavior: Volunteering and the social environment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(5-6), pages 445-454, June.
    3. Krawczyk, Michał, 2012. "Testing for hypothetical bias in willingness to support a reforestation program," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 282-289.
    4. Le Zhang & Andreas Ortmann, 2013. "On the Interpretation of Giving, Taking, and Destruction in Dictator Games and Joy-of-Destruction Games," Discussion Papers 2012-50A, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
    5. Daniel Zizzo, 2010. "Experimenter demand effects in economic experiments," Experimental Economics, Springer, vol. 13(1), pages 75-98, March.
    6. Ellen P. Green, 2012. "Payment Mechanisms in the Healthcare Industry: An Experimental Study of Physician Incentives in a Multiple Principal Agent Setting," Working Papers 12-11, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
    7. Libor Dušek & Andreas Ortman & Lubomír Lízal, 2005. "Understanding Corruption and Corruptibility Through Experiments," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2005(2), pages 147-162.
    8. Ellen P. Green, 2013. "Payment Systems in the Healthcare Industry: An Experimental Study Of Physician Incentives," Working Papers 13-05, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.

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