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More on gender differences in lying

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Author Info

  • Gylfason, Haukur Freyr
  • Arnardottir, Audur Arna
  • Kristinsson, Kari
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    Abstract

    Responsiveness to payoffs and differences in culture have been considered as reasons why women have a greater aversion to lying than men. By using smaller stakes in a sender–receiver game than Dreber and Johannesson, but similar culture, no gender difference was found.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165176513000463
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

    Volume (Year): 119 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 94-96

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:119:y:2013:i:1:p:94-96

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet

    Related research

    Keywords: Experiment; Gender; Lying;

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    References

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    1. Joseph Henrich, 2001. "In Search of Homo Economicus: Behavioral Experiments in 15 Small-Scale Societies," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 73-78, May.
    2. Matthias Sutter, 2007. "Deception through telling the truth?! Experimental evidence from individuals and teams," Working Papers 2007-26, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck.
    3. Alvin E. Roth & V. Prasnikar & M. Okuno-Fujiwara & S. Zamir, 1998. "Bargaining and market behavior in Jerusalem, Liubljana, Pittsburgh and Tokyo: an experimental study," Levine's Working Paper Archive 344, David K. Levine.
    4. Ernst Fehr & Simon Gaechter, 2000. "Fairness and Retaliation: The Economics of Reciprocity," CESifo Working Paper Series 336, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Dreber, Anna & Johannesson, Magnus, 2008. "Gender differences in deception," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 99(1), pages 197-199, April.
    6. Cobb-Clark, Deborah A. & Schurer, Stefanie, 2012. "The stability of big-five personality traits," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 11-15.
    7. Childs, Jason, 2012. "Gender differences in lying," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 114(2), pages 147-149.
    8. Charness, Gary & Gneezy, Uri, 2008. "What's in a name? Anonymity and social distance in dictator and ultimatum games," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 29-35, October.
    9. Singh, Jang & Carasco, Emily & Svensson, Goran & Wood, Greg & Callaghan, Michael, 2005. "A comparative study of the contents of corporate codes of ethics in Australia, Canada and Sweden," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 91-109, February.
    10. Rachel Croson & Uri Gneezy, 2009. "Gender Differences in Preferences," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 47(2), pages 448-74, June.
    11. Lisa Anderson & Francis DiTraglia & Jeffrey Gerlach, 2011. "Measuring altruism in a public goods experiment: a comparison of U.S. and Czech subjects," Experimental Economics, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 426-437, September.
    12. Ben-Ner, Avner & Kong, Fanmin & Putterman, Louis, 2004. "Share and share alike? Gender-pairing, personality, and cognitive ability as determinants of giving," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 581-589, October.
    13. Uri Gneezy, 2005. "Deception: The Role of Consequences," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(1), pages 384-394, March.
    14. Boone, Christophe & De Brabander, Bert & van Witteloostuijn, Arjen, 1999. "The impact of personality on behavior in five Prisoner's Dilemma games," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 343-377, June.
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    Cited by:
    1. Childs, Jason, 2013. "Personal characteristics and lying: An experimental investigation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(3), pages 425-427.

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