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Empirical determinants of in-kind redistribution: Partisan biases and the role of inflation

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  • Hessami, Zohal
  • Uebelmesser, Silke

Abstract

There is a dearth of research on the determinants of in-kind redistribution. Using dynamic panel data estimations for 32 OECD countries, we show that the in-kind share of social benefits is lower under left-wing governments. This effect is weakened when left-wing governments respond to inflation by increasing the share of in-kind transfers.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 118 (2013)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 318-320

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:118:y:2013:i:2:p:318-320

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet

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Keywords: In-kind redistribution; Social benefits; Partisan biases; Inflation;

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Cited by:
  1. Zohal Hessami, 2013. "Corruption, Public Procurement, and the Budget Composition: Theory and Evidence from OECD Countries," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2013-27, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.
  2. Zohal Hessami & Claudio Thum & Silke Uebelmesser, 2012. "A Political Economy Explanation for In-kind Redistribution: The Interplay of Corruption and Democracy," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2012-25, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.

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