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Measuring regional inequality by internet car price advertisements: Evidence for Germany

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  • Kholodilin, Konstantin A.
  • Siliverstovs, Boriss

Abstract

We suggest to use car sale prices from internet advertisements for measuring economic inequality between and within German regions. Our estimates of regional income levels and Gini indices based on advertisements are highly positively correlated with the official figures.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 116 (2012)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 414-417

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:116:y:2012:i:3:p:414-417

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Related research

Keywords: Car prices; Economic inequality; German NUTS1 and NUTS2 regions; Gini index; Internet;

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  1. Nikos Askitas & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2009. "Google Econometrics and Unemployment Forecasting," Research Notes of the German Council for Social and Economic Data 41, German Council for Social and Economic Data (RatSWD).
  2. Francesco D’Amuri & Juri Marcucci, 2010. "“Google it!”Forecasting the US Unemployment Rate with a Google Job Search index," Working Papers 2010.31, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  3. Peter Krause & Andrea Schäfer, 2005. "Verteilung von Vermögen und Einkommen in Deutschland: große Unterschiede nach Geschlecht und Alter," DIW Wochenbericht, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 72(11), pages 199-207.
  4. Konstantin A. Kholodilin & Maximilian Podstawski & Boriss Siliverstovs, 2010. "Do Google Searches Help in Nowcasting Private Consumption? A Real-Time Evidence for the US," KOF Working papers 10-256, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
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Cited by:
  1. Vyacheslav Dombrovsky & Konstantin A. Kholodilin & Boriss Siliverstovs, 2011. "Using Personal Car Register for Measuring Economic Inequality in Countries with a Large Share of Shadow Economy: Evidence for Latvia," KOF Working papers 11-287, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
  2. David Iselin & Boriss Siliverstovs, 2013. "Using Newspapers for Tracking the Business Cycle: A comparative study for Germany and Switzerland," KOF Working papers 13-337, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.

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