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Simultaneity bias in the analysis of perceived job insecurity and subjective well-being

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  • Geishecker, Ingo
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    Abstract

    The paper assesses perceived job insecurity as a determinant of current subjective well-being and demonstrates that standard models may yield significantly downward biased estimates.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165176512001140
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

    Volume (Year): 116 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 3 ()
    Pages: 319-321

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:116:y:2012:i:3:p:319-321

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet

    Related research

    Keywords: Job security; Life satisfaction; Happiness; Unemployment;

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    References

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    1. Andrew Clark & Andreas Knabe & Steffen Rätzel, 2008. "Boon or Bane? Others' Unemployment, Well-being and Job Insecurity," CESifo Working Paper Series 2501, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Charles F. Manski & John D. Straub, 2000. "Worker Perceptions of Job Insecurity in the Mid-1990s: Evidence from the Survey of Economic Expectations," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 35(3), pages 447-479.
    3. Christopher F Baum & Mark E. Schaffer & Steven Stillman, 2002. "Instrumental variables and GMM: Estimation and testing," North American Stata Users' Group Meetings 2003 05, Stata Users Group.
    4. Andreas Knabe & Steffen Rätzel, 2008. "Scarring or Scaring? The Psychological Impact of Past Unemployment and Future Unemployment Risk," FEMM Working Papers 08013, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Faculty of Economics and Management.
    5. Schmidt, Stefanie R, 1999. "Long-Run Trends in Workers' Beliefs about Their Own Job Security: Evidence from the General Social Survey," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(4), pages S127-41, October.
    6. Simon Luechinger & Stephan Meier & Alois Stutzer, 2008. "Why Does Unemployment Hurt the Employed? Evidence from the Life Satisfaction Gap between the Public and the Private Sector," Working papers 2008/02, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel.
    7. Ferrie, Jane E. & Shipley, Martin J. & Newman, Katherine & Stansfeld, Stephen A. & Marmot, Michael, 2005. "Self-reported job insecurity and health in the Whitehall II study: potential explanations of the relationship," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 60(7), pages 1593-1602, April.
    8. Gert G. Wagner & Joachim R. Frick & Jürgen Schupp, 2007. "The German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP): Scope, Evolution and Enhancements," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 1, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    9. Green, Francis & Felstead, Alan & Burchell, Brendan, 2000. " Job Insecurity and the Difficulty of Regaining Employment: An Empirical Study of Unemployment Expectations," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 62(0), pages 855-83, Special I.
    10. Patricia Tracy Jones & Stephen Nickell & Glenda Quintini, 2000. "A Picture of Job Insecurity Facing British Men," CEP Discussion Papers dp0479, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
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