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Parameter heterogeneity in growth regressions

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  • Hineline, David R.
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    Abstract

    This paper explores the appropriateness of pooling many diverse countries together in growth regressions. It is shown that estimates are sensitive to small changes in the sample, and separating OECD and non-OECD countries can result in drastic differences.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V84-4T0MMCR-2/2/8414bbc5b6424ec64db2a9841623d24e
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

    Volume (Year): 101 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 2 (November)
    Pages: 126-129

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:101:y:2008:i:2:p:126-129

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet

    Related research

    Keywords: Parameter heterogeneity Growth regressions;

    References

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    1. Stanley Fischer, 1993. "The Role of Macroeconomic Factors in Growth," NBER Working Papers 4565, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Theo Eicher & Andreas Leukert, 2009. "Institutions and Economic Performance: Endogeneity and Parameter Heterogeneity," Working Papers UWEC-2007-16-P, University of Washington, Department of Economics.
    3. By Mohsin S. Khan & Abdelhak S. Senhadji, 2001. "Threshold Effects in the Relationship Between Inflation and Growth," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 48(1), pages 1.
    4. Durlauf, Steven N. & Johnson, Paul A. & Temple, Jonathan R.W., 2005. "Growth Econometrics," Handbook of Economic Growth, in: Philippe Aghion & Steven Durlauf (ed.), Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 8, pages 555-677 Elsevier.
    5. Andros Kourtellos, 2002. "Modeling Parameter Heterogeneity in Cross Country Growth Regression Models," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 0212, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
    6. Kormendi, Roger C. & Meguire, Philip G., 1985. "Macroeconomic determinants of growth: Cross-country evidence," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 141-163, September.
    7. Xavier Sala-I-Martin & Gernot Doppelhofer & Ronald I. Miller, 2004. "Determinants of Long-Term Growth: A Bayesian Averaging of Classical Estimates (BACE) Approach," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(4), pages 813-835, September.
    8. Winford H. Masanjala & Chris Papageorgiou, 2004. "The Solow model with CES technology: nonlinearities and parameter heterogeneity," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(2), pages 171-201.
    9. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why Do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output Per Worker Than Others?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 114(1), pages 83-116, February.
    10. Richard C.K. Burdekin & Arthur T. Denzau & Manfred W. Keil & Thitithep Sitthiyot & Thomas D. Willett, . "When Does Inflation Hurt Economic Growth? Different Nonlinearities for Different Economies," Claremont Colleges Working Papers 2000-22, Claremont Colleges.
    11. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2001. "The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Empirical Investigation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1369-1401, December.
    12. Giorgio Canarella & Stephen Pollard, 2004. "Parameter Heterogeneity In The Neoclassical Growth Model: A Quantile Regression Approach," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 29(1), pages 1-31, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:
    1. James L. Butkiewicz & Halit Yanikkaya, 2011. "Institutions and the impact of government spending on growth," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 0, pages 319-341, November.
    2. Bonnie Wilson & Jac Heckelman, 2010. "The Political Economy of Investment: Sclerotic Effects from Interest Groups," Working Papers 2012-03, Saint Louis University, Department of Economics.
    3. Ziesemer, Thomas, 2009. "The Impact of the Credit Crisis on Poor Developing Countries: Growth, worker remittances, accumulation and migration," MERIT Working Papers 026, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    4. Tuomas Malinen, 2012. "Estimating the long-run relationship between income inequality and economic development," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 209-233, February.
    5. Ziesemer, Thomas, 2008. "Worker remittances, migration, accumulation and growth in poor developing countries," MERIT Working Papers 063, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    6. Van Hoa, Tran & Limskul, Kitti, 2013. "Economic impact of CO2 emissions on Thailand's growth and climate change mitigation policy: A modelling analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 651-658.
    7. Ziesemer, Thomas, 2008. "Worker remittances, migration, accumulation and growth in poor developing countries," MERIT Working Papers 063, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    8. Ziesemer, Thomas H.W., 2012. "Worker remittances, migration, accumulation and growth in poor developing countries: Survey and analysis of direct and indirect effects," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 103-118.
    9. Ziesemer, Thomas, 2010. "The Impact of the Credit Crisis on Poor Developing Countries and the Role of China in Pulling and Crowding Us Out," MERIT Working Papers 004, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    10. Lee, Jim, 2011. "Export specialization and economic growth around the world," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 45-63, March.
    11. Ziesemer, Thomas, 2010. "The Impact of the Credit Crisis on Poor Developing Countries and the Role of China in Pulling and Crowding Us Out," MERIT Working Papers 004, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    12. Ziesemer, Thomas, 2009. "The Impact of the Credit Crisis on Poor Developing Countries: Growth, worker remittances, accumulation and migration," MERIT Working Papers 026, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).

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