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The social development effects of primary commodity export dependence

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  • Carmignani, Fabrizio
  • Avom, Desire

Abstract

On the question of whether natural resources are a curse for growth, the jury is still out. While waiting for a decision, we study whether resource intensity has any effect on social development over and above the effect it might have on income or growth. We measure social development by a combination of health and education outcomes and resource intensity by the share of primary commodities in total merchandise exports. We find that, after controlling for per-capita income and other macroeconomic and institutional factors, a higher dependence on primary commodity exports is negative for social development. The transmission mechanism seems to operate via income inequality and macroeconomic volatility.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Ecological Economics.

Volume (Year): 70 (2010)
Issue (Month): 2 (December)
Pages: 317-330

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:70:y:2010:i:2:p:317-330

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolecon

Related research

Keywords: Social development Natural resources Primary commodities Inequality Volatility;

References

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Cited by:
  1. Cockx, Lara & Francken, Nathalie, 2014. "Extending the concept of the resource curse : Natural resources and public spending on health," IOB Working Papers 2014.01, Universiteit Antwerpen, Institute of Development Policy and Management (IOB).
  2. Carmignani, Fabrizio, 2013. "Development outcomes, resource abundance, and the transmission through inequality," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 412-428.
  3. Fabrizio Carmignani & Abdur Chowdhury, 2011. "The Development Effects Of Natural Resources: A Geographical Dimension," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp1022, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.

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