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Structural decomposition analysis of sources of decarbonizing economic development in China; 1992-2006

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  • Zhang, Youguo
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    Abstract

    To analyze and understand decarbonizing economic development in China, this paper undertakes a structural decomposition analysis of the historical change in energy-related carbon intensity in China between 1992 and 2006. The results show that the energy-related carbon intensity in China decreased by about three-fourths between 1992 and 2006 and reduced carbon emissions by about two billion tons. The decline in the energy-related carbon intensity was mainly caused by changes in production pattern, especially changes in energy intensity within each sector between 1992 and 2002. However, the most important driving force of carbon intensity from 2002-2006 was not the energy intensity within each sector but the input mix. On the other hand, changes in demand pattern pushed up the carbon intensity. To further decarbonize the economy in the future, it is important for China to further enforce policies on shaping the production pattern, such as reducing energy intensity, and pay more attention to increasing the sustainability of the demand pattern at the same time.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Ecological Economics.

    Volume (Year): 68 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 8-9 (June)
    Pages: 2399-2405

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:68:y:2009:i:8-9:p:2399-2405

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolecon

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    Keywords: Decarbonizing Carbon intensity Production pattern Demand pattern Structural decomposition analysis;

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    1. Machado, Giovani & Schaeffer, Roberto & Worrell, Ernst, 2001. "Energy and carbon embodied in the international trade of Brazil: an input-output approach," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 409-424, December.
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    Cited by:
    1. Wang, Yafei & Liang, Sai, 2013. "Carbon dioxide mitigation target of China in 2020 and key economic sectors," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 90-96.
    2. Brizga, Janis & Feng, Kuishuang & Hubacek, Klaus, 2014. "Drivers of greenhouse gas emissions in the Baltic States: A structural decomposition analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 22-28.
    3. Wang, Yafei & Zhao, Hongyan & Li, Liying & Liu, Zhu & Liang, Sai, 2013. "Carbon dioxide emission drivers for a typical metropolis using input–output structural decomposition analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 312-318.
    4. Zeng, Lin & Xu, Ming & Liang, Sai & Zeng, Siyu & Zhang, Tianzhu, 2014. "Revisiting drivers of energy intensity in China during 1997–2007: A structural decomposition analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 640-647.
    5. Youguo Zhang, 2012. "Scale, Technique and Composition Effects in Trade-Related Carbon Emissions in China," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 51(3), pages 371-389, March.
    6. Anderson, Blake & M'Gonigle, Michael, 2012. "Does ecological economics have a future?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 37-48.
    7. Liang, Sai & Zhang, Tianzhu, 2011. "What is driving CO2 emissions in a typical manufacturing center of South China? The case of Jiangsu Province," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(11), pages 7078-7083.
    8. Wiedmann, Thomas & Wilting, Harry C. & Lenzen, Manfred & Lutter, Stephan & Palm, Viveka, 2011. "Quo Vadis MRIO? Methodological, data and institutional requirements for multi-region input-output analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(11), pages 1937-1945, September.
    9. Meng, Bo & Xue, Jinjun & Feng, Kuishuang & Guan, Dabo & Fu, Xue, 2013. "China’s inter-regional spillover of carbon emissions and domestic supply chains," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 1305-1321.
    10. Zhang, Youguo, 2010. "Supply-side structural effect on carbon emissions in China," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 186-193, January.
    11. Su, Bin & Ang, B.W., 2012. "Structural decomposition analysis applied to energy and emissions: Some methodological developments," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 177-188.

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