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Design, evaluation, and sustainability of private schools for the poor: the Pakistan urban and rural fellowship school experiments

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  • Alderman, Harold
  • Kim, Jooseop
  • Orazem, Peter F.

Abstract

Balochistan Province of Pakistan initiated two pilot programs attempting to induce the creation of private schools for poor girls. Randomized assignment to treatment and control groups is used to measure program effectiveness. The pilot schools were successful in urban areas, but relative failures in rural areas. Urban schools benefited from larger supplies of children not served by government schools, better availability of teachers, and more educated parents with higher incomes. Use of experienced school operators in the urban pilot was another critical difference. All urban schools appear self-sustaining or else require a modest subsidy, whereas only one rural school may survive as a private school. These pilots show that private schools may offer a viable alternative supply of educational services to poor urban neighborhoods in developing countries. However, they are not likely to offer solutions to undersupply of educational services to rural areas.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics of Education Review.

Volume (Year): 22 (2003)
Issue (Month): 3 (June)
Pages: 265-274

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:22:y:2003:i:3:p:265-274

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  1. Alderman, Harold & Orazem, Peter & Paterno, Elizabeth M., 2001. "School Quality, School Cost, and the Public/Private School Choices of Low-Income Households in Pakistan," Staff General Research Papers 1970, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  2. Kim, Jooseop & Alderman, Harold & Orazem, Peter, 1999. "Can Private School Subsidies Increase Schooling for the Poor? The Quetta Urban Fellowship Program," Staff General Research Papers 1709, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  3. Harold Alderman & Jere R. Behrman & David R. Ross & Richard Sabot, 1996. "Decomposing the Gender Gap in Cognitive Skills in a Poor Rural Economy," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 31(1), pages 229-254.
  4. Gertler, Paul & Glewwe, Paul, 1990. "The willingness to pay for education in developing countries : Evidence from rural Peru," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 251-275, August.
  5. Newman, John & Rawlings, Laura & Gertler, Paul, 1994. "Using Randomized Control Designs in Evaluating Social Sector Programs in Developing Countries," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 9(2), pages 181-201, July.
  6. Kingdon, Geeta, 1996. "The Quality and Efficiency of Private and Public Education: A Case-Study of Urban India," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 58(1), pages 57-82, February.
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Cited by:
  1. Wendy Janssens, 2005. "Measuring Externalities in Program Evaluation," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 05-017/2, Tinbergen Institute, revised 30 Mar 2006.
  2. Tahir Andrabi & Jishnu Das & Asim Ijaz Khwaja & Tristan Zajonc, 2011. "Do Value-Added Estimates Add Value? Accounting for Learning Dynamics," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(3), pages 29-54, July.
  3. Andrabi, Tahir & Das, Jishnu & Khwaja, Asim Ijaz, 2011. "Students today, teachers tomorrow ? identifying constraints on the provision of Education," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5674, The World Bank.
  4. Margaret Grosh & Carlo del Ninno & Emil Tesliuc & Azedine Ouerghi, 2008. "For Protection and Promotion : The Design and Implementation of Effective Safety Nets," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6582, July.
  5. Orazem, Peter & Glewwe, Paul & Patrinos, Harry, 2007. "The Benefits and Costs of Alternative Strategies to Improve Educational Outcomes," Staff General Research Papers 12853, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  6. Kenneth Hartgen & Stephan Klasen & Mark Misselhorn, 2009. "Pro-Poor Progress in Education in Developing Countries?," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 8, Courant Research Centre PEG.
  7. Banerjee, Ritwik & King, Elizabeth M. & Orazem, Peter & Paterno, Elizabeth M., 2010. "Student and Teacher Attendance: The Role of Shared Goods in Reducing Absenteeism," Staff General Research Papers 32167, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  8. Wendy Janssens, 2005. "Measuring Externalities in Program Evaluation," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 05-017/2, Tinbergen Institute, revised 30 Mar 2006.
  9. Orazem, Peter, 2007. "Lack of Education," Staff General Research Papers 12671, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  10. David K. Evans & Arkadipta Ghosh, 2008. "Prioritizing Educational Investments in Children in the Developing World," Working Papers 587, RAND Corporation Publications Department.

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