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Methods of household consumption measurement through surveys: Experimental results from Tanzania

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Author Info

  • Beegle, Kathleen
  • De Weerdt, Joachim
  • Friedman, Jed
  • Gibson, John

Abstract

Surveys of consumption expenditure vary widely across many dimensions, including the level of reporting, the length of the reference period, and the degree of commodity detail. These variations occur both across countries and also over time within countries, with little current understanding of the implications of such changes for spatially and temporally consistent measurement of household consumption and poverty. A field experiment in Tanzania tests eight alternative methods of measuring household consumption, finding significant differences between consumption reported by the benchmark personal diary and other diary and recall formats. Under-reporting is particularly apparent for illiterate households and for urban respondents completing household diaries; recall modules measure lower consumption than a personal diary, with larger gaps among poorer households and for households with more adult members. Variations in reporting accuracy by household characteristics are also discussed and differences in measured poverty as a result of survey design are explored.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Development Economics.

Volume (Year): 98 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 3-18

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Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:98:y:2012:i:1:p:3-18

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/devec

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Keywords: Consumption; Expenditure; Survey design;

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References

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Citations

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Economists have experiments figured out. What’s next? (Hint: It’s Measurement)
    by Berk Ozler in Development Impact on 2013-01-14 10:15:43
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Cited by:
  1. Lépine, Aurélia & Strobl, Eric, 2013. "The Effect of Women’s Bargaining Power on Child Nutrition in Rural Senegal," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 17-30.
  2. Larson, Donald F. & Otsuka, Keijiro & Matsumoto, Tomoya & Kilic, Talip, 2012. "Should African rural development strategies depend on smallholder farms ? an exploration of the inverse productivity hypothesis," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6190, The World Bank.
  3. de Nicola, Francesca & Giné, Xavier, 2014. "How accurate are recall data? Evidence from coastal India," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 52-65.
  4. John Gibson & Kathleen Beegle & Joachim De Weerdt & Jed Friedman, 2013. "What Does Variation in Survey Design Reveal About the Nature of Measurement Errors in Household Consumption?," Working Papers in Economics 13/01, University of Waikato, Department of Economics.
  5. Headey, Derek, 2011. "Was the global food crisis really a crisis?: Simulations versus self-reporting," IFPRI discussion papers 1087, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Houngbedji, Kenneth & Cogneau, Denis & Mesplé-Somps, Sandrine, 2013. "The fall of the elephant. Two decades of poverty increase in Côte d’Ivoire (1988 - 2008)," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/12510, Paris Dauphine University.
  7. Cojocaru, Alexandru & Diagne, Mame Fatou, 2013. "How reliable and consistent are subjective measures of welfare in Europe and Central Asia ? evidence from the second life in transition survey," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6359, The World Bank.
  8. Elena Gross & Isabel Günther & Youdi Schipper, 2013. "Women: Walking and Waiting for Water The Time Value of Public Water Supply," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 134, Courant Research Centre PEG.
  9. Gibson, John & Kim, Bonggeun, 2013. "How reliable are household expenditures as a proxy for permanent income? Implications for the income–nutrition relationship," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 118(1), pages 23-25.
  10. Belton, Ben & van Asseldonk, Imke Josepha Mariana & Thilsted, Shakuntala Haraksingh, 2014. "Faltering fisheries and ascendant aquaculture: Implications for food and nutrition security in Bangladesh," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 77-87.
  11. De Weerdt, Joachim & Beegle, Kathleen & Friedman,, Jed & Gibson, John, 2014. "The challenge of measuring hunger," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6736, The World Bank.
  12. Luisa Natali & Marta Moratti & UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre, 2012. "Measuring Household Welfare: Short versus long consumption modules," Innocenti Working Papers inwopa671, UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre.
  13. Hassine, Nadia Belhaj, 2014. "Economic inequality in the Arab region," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6911, The World Bank.
  14. Deininger, Klaus & Carletto, Calogero & Savastano, Sara & Muwonge, James, 2011. "Can diaries help improve agricultural production statistics ? Evidence from Uganda," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5717, The World Bank.
  15. Headey, Derek D. & Ecker, Olivier, 2012. "Improving the measurement of food security:," IFPRI discussion papers 1225, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  16. Alexandru Cojocaru, 2011. "Inequality and well-being in transition economies: A non-experimental test of inequality aversion," Working Papers 238, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.

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