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Economic growth and defense spending : Granger Causality

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  • Joerding, Wayne
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Development Economics.

    Volume (Year): 21 (1986)
    Issue (Month): 1 (April)
    Pages: 35-40

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:21:y:1986:i:1:p:35-40

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/devec

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    Cited by:
    1. Alptekin, Aynur & Levine, Paul, 2012. "Military expenditure and economic growth: A meta-analysis," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 636-650.
    2. Obreja Brasoveanu, Laura, 2010. "The Impact of Defense Expenditure on Economic Growth," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(4), pages 148-167, December.
    3. Abu-Qarn, Aamer, 2010. "The Defense-growth nexus: An application for the Israeli-Arab conflict," MPRA Paper 22275, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2010.
    4. Huseyin Kalyoncu & Fatih Yucel, 2006. "An analytical approach on defense expenditure and economic growth: The case of Turkey and Greece," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 33(5), pages 336-343, November.
    5. Carlos Barros, 2002. "Development and conflict in the Balkans: Catch-up and military expenditure," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(5), pages 353-363.
    6. Eduardo Morales-Ramos, 2002. "Defence R&D expenditure: The crowding-out hypothesis," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(5), pages 365-383.
    7. Dritsakis, N., 2004. "Defense spending and economic growth: an empirical investigation for Greece and Turkey," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 249-264, February.
    8. Gurgul, Henryk & Lach, Łukasz & Mestel, Roland, 2012. "The relationship between budgetary expenditure and economic growth in Poland," MPRA Paper 52304, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Paul Dunne & Eftychia Nikolaidou, 2005. "Military Spending and Economic Growth in Greece, Portugal and Spain," Working Papers 0510, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    10. Abu-Bader, Suleiman & Abu-Qarn, Aamer S., 2003. "Government expenditures, military spending and economic growth: causality evidence from Egypt, Israel, and Syria," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 25(6-7), pages 567-583, September.
    11. Gurgul, Henryk & Lach, Łukasz, 2011. "Causality analysis between public expenditure and economic growth of Polish economy in last decade," MPRA Paper 52281, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Habibullah, M.S. & Law, Siong-Hook & Dayang-Afizzah, A.M., 2008. "Defense spending and economic growth in Asian economies: A panel error-correction approach," MPRA Paper 12105, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Kollias, Christos & Manolas, George & Paleologou, Suzanna-Maria, 2004. "Defence expenditure and economic growth in the European Union: A causality analysis," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 553-569, July.
    14. Dakurah, A. Henry & Davies, Stephen P. & Sampath, Rajan K., 2001. "Defense spending and economic growth in developing countries: A causality analysis," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 651-658, August.
    15. Hsien-Hung Kung & Jennifer C. H. Min, 2013. "Military Spending and Economic Growth Nexus in Sixteen Latin and South American Countries: A Bootstrap Panel Causality Test," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(4), pages 171-185, December.
    16. Alexamder, W.R. & Hansen, P. Author-Emai, 2004. "A Criritique of the Multi-Sector Model of the Effects of Military Spending on Economic Growth," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 4(2).
    17. Hirnissa, M.T & Habibullah, M.S. & Baharom, A.H., 2008. "Military and Economic Growth in ASEAN-5 Countries," MPRA Paper 13108, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    18. Liang, Chyi-Lyi (Kathleen) & Feuz, Dillon M. & Taylor, R. Garth, 1998. "Spatial And Varietal Price Analysis Of Dry Edible Bean Markets," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IAMA), vol. 1(03).

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