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Social protection and children in developing countries

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  • Gatenio Gabel, Shirley
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    Abstract

    Children are one of the most vulnerable groups in almost any population because of their physical and emotional dependence on adults and social status. Their vulnerability is greater in developing countries because of the higher incidence of poverty and fewer social protection mechanisms in place compared to industrialized countries. In most developing countries, children are not the explicit recipients of the unprecedented growth in social protection efforts but do benefit from its expansion. This paper looks at how social protection is evolving in developing countries and how it relates to the vulnerabilities of children. It goes on to present the different conceptual models for protection and how they have changed and been influenced by the changing definition of poverty and the growth in transnational knowledge and policymaking. The paper then considers cash transfer programs that have been introduced and their effects on child well being. It ends with a discussion of the need to focus on system-wide social protection strategies to address children's vulnerabilities and future directions needed.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740911003781
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Children and Youth Services Review.

    Volume (Year): 34 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 3 ()
    Pages: 537-545

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:34:y:2012:i:3:p:537-545

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/childyouth

    Related research

    Keywords: social protection; developing countries; children; social policy;

    References

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    1. Alderman,Harold & Hoddinott, John & Kinsey, Bill, 2003. "Long-term consequences of early childhood malnutrition," FCND discussion papers 168, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    7. Anne Case & Victoria Hosegood & Frances Lund, 2004. "The Reach and Impact of Child Support Grants: Evidence from KwaZulu-Natal," Working Papers 241, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Health and Wellbeing..
    8. Caroline Harper & Nicola Jones & Paola Pereznieto & Andy McKay, 2011. "Promoting Children's Well‐being: Policy Lessons from Past and Present Economic Crises," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 29, pages 621-641, 09.
    9. Baird, Sarah & Mcintosh, Craig & Ozler, Berk, 2010. "Cash or condition ? evidence from a cash transfer experiment," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5259, The World Bank.
    10. Ariel Fiszbein & Norbert Schady & Francisco H. G. Ferreira & Margaret Grosh & Niall Keleher & Pedro Olinto & Emmanuel Skoufias, 2009. "Conditional Cash Transfers : Reducing Present and Future Poverty," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2597, October.
    11. Haas, Peter M., 1992. "Introduction: epistemic communities and international policy coordination," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 46(01), pages 1-35, December.
    12. Fernando Hoces de la Guardia & Andrés Hojman & Osvaldo Larrañaga, 2011. "Evaluating the Chile Solidario program: results using the Chile Solidario panel and the administrative databases," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 38(1 Year 20), pages 129-168, June.
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    14. Alain de Janvry & Elisabeth Sadoulet, 2006. "Making Conditional Cash Transfer Programs More Efficient: Designing for Maximum Effect of the Conditionality," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 20(1), pages 1-29.
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