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Household income mobility in China and its decomposition

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  • Ding, Ning
  • Wang, Yougui

Abstract

Using the data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS), we measured the income mobility of households in China from 1989 to 2000. The results are decomposed into three sources: exchange, growth, and dispersion. These results show that the household income mobility in China remained at a high level from 1989 to 2000, which is due to an exchange process accompanied by high growth. Tracing the history of macroeconomic policy in China, we found that the mode of income mobility is closely associated with these policies when the time lag is taken into account.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal China Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 19 (2008)
Issue (Month): 3 (September)
Pages: 373-380

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Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:19:y:2008:i:3:p:373-380

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  1. Niny Khor & John Pencavel, 2006. "Income mobility of individuals in China and the United States," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 14(3), pages 417-458, 07.
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  9. Hussain, Athar & Lanjouw, Peter & Stern, Nicholas, 1994. "Income inequalities in China: Evidence from household survey data," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 22(12), pages 1947-1957, December.
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Cited by:
  1. Chamon, Marcos & Liu, Kai & Prasad, Eswar, 2010. "Income Uncertainty and Household Savings in China," IZA Discussion Papers 5331, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Lukiyanova Anna & Oshchepkov Aleksey, 2009. "Income Mobility in Russia (2000 – 2005)," EERC Working Paper Series 09/02e, EERC Research Network, Russia and CIS.
  3. Yi Chen & Frank A Cowell, 2013. "Mobility in China," STICERD - Public Economics Programme Discussion Papers 18, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
  4. Shuang LI & Ming LU & Hiroshi Sato, 2008. "The Value of Power in China: How Do Party Membership and Social Networks Affect Pay in Different Ownership Sectors?," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series gd08-011, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  5. Huang, Jing & Wang, Yougui, 2014. "The time-dependent characteristics of relative mobility," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 291-295.

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