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A model of industrial hollowing-out of neighboring countries by the economic growth of China

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  • Kim, Yong Jin
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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6W46-4M21T14-1/2/cc2fa91b4f7c6df33db0af50944e7715
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal China Economic Review.

    Volume (Year): 18 (2007)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 122-138

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:18:y:2007:i:2:p:122-138

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chieco

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    References

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    1. Paul Krugman & Anthony J. Venables, 1995. "Globalization and the Inequality of Nations," NBER Working Papers 5098, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Abramovitz, Moses, 1986. "Catching Up, Forging Ahead, and Falling Behind," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 46(02), pages 385-406, June.
    3. Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silane & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1996. "Law and Finance," NBER Working Papers 5661, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Nancy L Stokey, 1986. "Learning-by-Doing and the Introduction of New Goods," Discussion Papers 699, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science, revised May 1987.
    5. Antonio Ciccone & Robert E. Hall, 1996. "Productivity and the Density of Economic Activity," NBER Working Papers 4313, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Becker, Gary S & Murphy, Kevin M, 1992. "The Division of Labor, Coordination Costs, and Knowledge," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 107(4), pages 1137-60, November.
    7. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1993. "Making a Miracle," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 61(2), pages 251-72, March.
    8. Andrew Atkeson & Patrick J. Kehoe, 2002. "Measuring Organization Capital," NBER Working Papers 8722, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Ximena Clark & David Dollar & Alejandro Micco, 2004. "Port Efficiency, Maritime Transport Costs and Bilateral Trade," NBER Working Papers 10353, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2002. "Reversal Of Fortune: Geography And Institutions In The Making Of The Modern World Income Distribution," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1231-1294, November.
    11. Leahy, Dermot & Neary, J. Peter, 2007. "Absorptive capacity, R&D spillovers, and public policy," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 1089-1108, October.
    12. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
    13. Young, Alwyn, 1991. "Learning by Doing and the Dynamic Effects of International Trade," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 106(2), pages 369-405, May.
    14. Young, Alwyn, 1993. "Invention and Bounded Learning by Doing," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(3), pages 443-72, June.
    15. Alwyn Young, 1991. "Learning by Doing and the Dynamic Effects of International Trade," NBER Working Papers 3577, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:
    1. Michael Funke & Marc Gronwald, 2008. "The undisclosed Renminbi Basket: are the markets telling us something about where the Renminbi - US Dollar Exchange Rate is going?," Quantitative Macroeconomics Working Papers 20812b, Hamburg University, Department of Economics.
    2. Colavecchio, Roberta & Funke, Michael, 2009. "Volatility dependence across Asia-Pacific onshore and offshore currency forwards markets," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 174-196, March.

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