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Productivity Growth in Some Energy Intensive Manufacturing Industries in India: An Analytical Assessment

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  • Sarbapriya Ray

    (Department of Commerce, Shyampur Siddheswari Mahavidyalaya, University of Calcutta, West Bengal, India.)

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    Abstract

    This paper estimates productivity performance of India’s energy intensive industries in terms of total factor productivity growth for the entire period, 1979-80 to 2003-04. The productivity performance has been judged in view of translog indices under three input framework-material, labour and capital and a model has been evolved for assessing energy intensity in those industries. The result on the overall productivity shows declining total factor productivity growth during post-reform period as compared to pre-reform period. Total output growth in India’s energy intensive an industry is found to be mainly input-driven rather than productivity-driven. The liberalization process is found to have its adverse impact on total factor productivity growth.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Econjournals in its journal International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues.

    Volume (Year): 2 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 54-70

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    Handle: RePEc:eco:journ1:2012-01-7

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    Web page: http://www.econjournals.com

    Related research

    Keywords: Energy; Intensity; Productivity; Liberalization;

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    1. Jorgenson, Dale W, 1988. "Productivity and Postwar U.S. Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 2(4), pages 23-41, Fall.
    2. Pravin Krishna & Devashish Mitra, . "Trade Liberalization, Market Discipline and Productivity Growth: New Evidence From India," Working Papers 96-8, Brown University, Department of Economics.
    3. Harrison, Ann E., 1994. "Productivity, imperfect competition and trade reform : Theory and evidence," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1-2), pages 53-73, February.
    4. Fare, Rolf & Shawna Grosskopf & Mary Norris & Zhongyang Zhang, 1994. "Productivity Growth, Technical Progress, and Efficiency Change in Industrialized Countries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(1), pages 66-83, March.
    5. Berndt, Ernst R & Wood, David O, 1975. "Technology, Prices, and the Derived Demand for Energy," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 57(3), pages 259-68, August.
    6. Petia Topalova, 2004. "Trade Liberalization and Firm Productivity," IMF Working Papers 04/28, International Monetary Fund.
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