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Unemployment Insurance, Wage Dynamics and Inequality Over the Life Cycle

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  • Paul Bingley
  • Lorenzo Cappellari
  • Niels Westergård‐Nielsen

Abstract

We investigate the relationship between life cycle wages and individual membership of unemployment insurance schemes in Denmark. We separate permanent from transitory wages and characterise them using membership of unemployment insurance funds. We find that unemployment insurance is associated with lower wage growth heterogeneity over the life cycle and greater wage instability, changing the nature of wage inequality from permanent to transitory. While we are in general unable to formally test for moral hazard against adverse selection into unemployment insurance, robustness checks suggest that moral hazard is the relevant interpretation.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Royal Economic Society in its journal The Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): (2013)
Issue (Month): (05)
Pages: 341-372

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Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v::y:2013:i::p:341-372

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Cappellari, Lorenzo & Leonardi, Marco, 2006. "Earnings Instability and Tenure," IZA Discussion Papers 2527, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Paul Bingley & Lorenzo Cappellari, 2013. "Correlation of Brothers Earnings and Intergenerational Transmission," DISCE - Working Papers del Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza def6, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimenti e Istituti di Scienze Economiche (DISCE).
  3. Salverda, Wiemer & Checchi, Daniele, 2014. "Labour-Market Institutions and the Dispersion of Wage Earnings," IZA Discussion Papers 8220, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Bingley, Paul & Cappellari, Lorenzo, 2012. "Alike in Many Ways: Intergenerational and Sibling Correlations of Brothers' Earnings," IZA Discussion Papers 6987, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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