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The effect of unemployment on consumption: an experimental analysis

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  • Enrica Carbone
  • John D. Hey

Abstract

This paper reports on an experiment that investigates the apparently robust phenomenon of over-sensitivity of consumption to current income. Using a particularly simple formulation, we also investigate whether individuals correctly respond to their employment status. We find that subjects over-react. Our data enables us to investigate where this over-sensitivity originates; we conclude that economic agents differ in their ability to plan ahead and understand the dynamic process determining their employment status. However, agents seem able to respond appropriately to "changes" in the parameters governing their decision processes, in that the comparative static predictions of the theory are largely confirmed. Copyright 2004 Royal Economic Society.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Royal Economic Society in its journal The Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 114 (2004)
Issue (Month): 497 (07)
Pages: 660-683

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Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:114:y:2004:i:497:p:660-683

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Cited by:
  1. Ferruccio Ponzano & Roberto Ricciuti, 2012. "An Experimental AK Model of Growth," CESifo Working Paper Series 3744, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. Enrica Carbone, 2006. "Understanding intertemporal choices," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(8), pages 889-898.
  3. Charness, Gary & Kuhn, Peter, 2011. "Lab Labor: What Can Labor Economists Learn from the Lab?," Handbook of Labor Economics, Elsevier.
  4. Ricciuti, Roberto, 2008. "Bringing macroeconomics into the lab," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 216-237, March.
  5. Enrique Fatás & Juan Lacomba & Francisco Lagos & Ana Moro-Egido, 2013. "An experimental test on dynamic consumption and lump-sum pensions," SERIEs, Spanish Economic Association, vol. 4(4), pages 393-413, November.
  6. Attema, Arthur E. & Brouwer, Werner B.F., 2012. "A test of independence of discounting from quality of life," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 22-34.
  7. T. Ballinger & Eric Hudson & Leonie Karkoviata & Nathaniel Wilcox, 2011. "Saving behavior and cognitive abilities," Experimental Economics, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 349-374, September.
  8. Enrique Fatás & Juan A. Lacomba & Francisco M. Lagos & Ana I. Moro, 2008. "Experimental tests on consumption, savings and pensions," ThE Papers 08/14, Department of Economic Theory and Economic History of the University of Granada..
  9. Wolfgang J. Luhan & Johann Scharler, 2013. "Monetary Policy, Inflation Illusion and the Taylor Principle – An Experimental Study," Ruhr Economic Papers 0402, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
  10. Thomas Meissner, 2013. "Intertemporal Consumption and Debt Aversion:An Experimental Study," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2013-045, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
  11. Jeannette Brosig-Koch & Klemens Keldenich, 2012. "The More You Know? – Consumption Behavior and the Communication of Economic Information," Ruhr Economic Papers 0387, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
  12. Enrica Carbone, 2005. "Demographics and Behaviour," Experimental Economics, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 217-232, September.
  13. Jürgen Arns & Kaushik Bhattacharya, 2005. "Modelling Aggregate Consumption Growth with Time-Varying Parameters," Bonn Econ Discussion Papers bgse15_2005, University of Bonn, Germany.
  14. John Duffy & Enrica Carbone, 2013. "Lifecycle Consumption Plans, Social Learning and External Habits: Experimental Evidence," Working Papers 513, University of Pittsburgh, Department of Economics, revised Sep 2013.
  15. Tomoki Kitamura & Yasuhiro Yonezawa & Munenori Nakasato, 2010. "Saving Behavior under the Influence of Income Risk: An Experimental Study," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 30(2), pages 967-974.

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