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Emotions and economic expectations: A field study

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  • Uri Benzion

    ()
    (Western Galilee College)

  • Shosh Shahrabani

    ()
    (The Max Stern Emek Yezreel College)

  • Tal Shavit

    ()
    (School of Business Administration, College of Management)

  • Rumy Weiss

    ()
    (Center for Academic Studies Or-Yehuda)

Abstract

The current field study examines emotions, evoked by a fire disaster, and economic expectations of people who were exposed to a fire disaster in Israel. We find that negative emotions are correlated with expectations regarding the economic self-improvement, as well as expectations for national economic improvement

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File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2012/Volume32/EB-12-V32-I2-P139.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

Volume (Year): 32 (2012)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 1455-1460

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Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-12-00188

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Keywords: Economic expectations; Emotions; Field study; Disaster.;

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  1. Jon Elster, 1998. "Emotions and Economic Theory," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 36(1), pages 47-74, March.
  2. Hanoch, Yaniv, 2002. ""Neither an angel nor an ant": Emotion as an aid to bounded rationality," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 1-25, February.
  3. George Loewenstein, 2000. "Emotions in Economic Theory and Economic Behavior," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 426-432, May.
  4. Richard H. Thaler, 2000. "From Homo Economicus to Homo Sapiens," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 14(1), pages 133-141, Winter.
  5. Daniel Vastfjall & Ellen Peters & Paul Slovic, 2008. "Affect, risk perception and future optimism after the tsunami disaster," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 3, pages 64-72, January.
  6. Johnson, Eric J, et al, 1993. " Framing, Probability Distortions, and Insurance Decisions," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, Springer, vol. 7(1), pages 35-51, August.
  7. Brian M. Lucey & Michael Dowling, 2005. "The Role of Feelings in Investor Decision-Making," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(2), pages 211-237, 04.
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