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Good news for experimenters: Subjects are hard to influence by instructorsʹ cues

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Author Info

  • Ivo Bischoff

    ()
    (University of Kassel)

  • Björn Frank

    ()
    (University of Kassel)

Abstract

An important concern of experimenters is that instructorsʹ nonverbal cues might change subject behavior. We let a professional actor try to produce this bias on purpose, finding only weak evidence for an "instructor demand effect", and only for female subjects.

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File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2011/Volume31/EB-11-V31-I4-P291.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

Volume (Year): 31 (2011)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 3221-3225

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Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-11-00779

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Related research

Keywords: Economic experiments; Methodology; Experimenter demand effects; Priming;

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References

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  1. Glenn W. Harrison & John A. List, 2004. "Field Experiments," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(4), pages 1009-1055, December.
  2. Selten, Reinhard & Ockenfels, Axel, 1998. "An experimental solidarity game," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 517-539, March.
  3. Rachel Croson & Uri Gneezy, 2009. "Gender Differences in Preferences," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 47(2), pages 448-74, June.
  4. Daniel Zizzo, 2010. "Experimenter demand effects in economic experiments," Experimental Economics, Springer, vol. 13(1), pages 75-98, March.
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Cited by:
  1. Korbinian von Blanckenburg & Milena Neubert, 2014. "Monopoly Profit Maximization: Success and Economic Principles," Working Papers 1406, Gutenberg School of Management and Economics, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, revised 16 May 2014.
  2. Ivo Bischoff & Thomas Krauskopf, 2013. "Motives of pro-social behavior in individual versus collective decisions – a comparative experimental study," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201319, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).

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