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The Re-Building Effect of Hurricanes: Evidence from Employment in the US Construction Industry

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Author Info

  • Eric Strobl

    ()
    (Ecole Polytechnique)

  • Frank Walsh

    ()
    (University College Dublin)

Abstract

We examine the impact of hurricane strikes on the construction industry in US counties. To this end we use a measure of hurricane destruction derived from a wind field model and historical hurricane track data and employ this within a dynamic labour demand framework. Our results show that destruction due to hurricanes causes on average an increase in county level employment in construction of a little over 25 per cent.

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File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2009/Volume29/EB-09-V29-I4-P294.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

Volume (Year): 29 (2009)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 3059-3066

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Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-09-00619

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Related research

Keywords: hurricanes; labour demand; construction industry;

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References

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  1. José Varejão & Pedro Portugal, 2007. "Spatial and Temporal Aggregation in the Estimation of Labor Demand Functions," Working Papers w200704, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
  2. Blundell, Richard & Bond, Stephen, 1998. "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 115-143, August.
  3. Belasen, Ariel R. & Polachek, Solomon, 2007. "How Disasters Affect Local Labor Markets: The Effects of Hurricanes in Florida," IZA Discussion Papers 2976, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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Cited by:
  1. Strobl, Eric, 2008. "The Economic Growth Impact of Hurricanes: Evidence from US Coastal Counties," IZA Discussion Papers 3619, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Deryugina, Tatyana, 2011. "The Role of Transfer Payments in Mitigating Shocks: Evidence From the Impact of Hurricanes," MPRA Paper 53307, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 08 Aug 2013.
  3. Karen Fisher-Vanden & Ian Sue Wing & Elisa Lanzi & David Popp, 2013. "Modeling climate change feedbacks and adaptation responses: recent approaches and shortcomings," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 117(3), pages 481-495, April.

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