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Do Chinese employers discriminate against females when hiring employees ?

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  • Shigeyuki Hamori

    ()
    (Kobe University)

  • Guifu Chen

    ()
    (Kobe University)

Abstract

In order to examine whether Chinese employers discriminated against females during the hiring process in 1996 and 2005, we used the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) questionnaire (1997 data, pooled data of 2004 and 2006) by referring to Johnson (1983) and Mohanty (1998). Empirical results of the 1996 sample reveal that male workers generally receive less favorable treatment and consequently enjoy a lower average employment probability than female workers. However, approximately a decade after the enactment of the labor law, the 2005 sample shows that male workers generally enjoy preferential treatment over female workers with otherwise identical worker characteristics. Our empirical results suggest that an increase in the education level of females, in the employment probability of females aged 25 and younger, and in the employment probability of females working in the government sector may prove effective in eliminating employment discrimination between males and females.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

Volume (Year): 10 (2008)
Issue (Month): 14 ()
Pages: 1-17

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Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-08j70009

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  1. Meng, Xin, 1998. "Male-female wage determination and gender wage discrimination in China's rural industrial sector," Labour Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 67-89, March.
  2. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
  3. Joni Hersch, 1991. "Male-female differences in hourly wages: The role of human capital, working conditions, and housework," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 44(4), pages 746-759, July.
  4. John Knight & Lina Song, 2003. "Increasing urban wage inequality in China," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 11(4), pages 597-619, December.
  5. Francine D. Blau & Andrea H. Beller, 1988. "Trends in earnings differentials by gender, 1971รป1981," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 41(4), pages 513-529, July.
  6. Madhu Mohanty, 1998. "Do US employers discriminate against females when hiring their employees?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(11), pages 1471-1482.
  7. Johnson, Janet L, 1983. "Sex Differentials in Unemployment Rates: A Case for No Concern," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(2), pages 293-303, April.
  8. Andrew M. Gill, 1989. "The role of discrimination in determining occupational structure," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 42(4), pages 610-623, July.
  9. Xin Meng & Junsen Zhang & Pak-Wai Liu, 2000. "Sectoral gender wage differentials and discrimination in the transitional Chinese economy," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 331-352.
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Cited by:
  1. Su, Biwei & Heshmati, Almas, 2011. "Analysis of Gender Wage Differential in China's Urban Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 6252, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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