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Measuring Time Poverty and Analyzing its Determinants: Concepts and Application to Guinea

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  • Quentin Wodon

    ()
    (World Bank)

  • Elena Bardasi

    ()
    (World Bank)

Abstract

The availability of better data on time use in developing countries makes it important to provide tools for analyzing such data. Conceptually, time poverty can be understood as the fact that some individuals do not have enough time for rest and leisure after taking into account the time spent working, whether in the labor market, for domestic work, or for other activities such as fetching water and wood. Unlike consumption or income, where economists assume that ‘more is better', time is a limited resource – more time spent working in paid or unpaid work-related activities means less leisure, and therefore higher ‘time poverty''. This paper provides a simple application of the concepts used in the consumption poverty literature to time use, in order to obtain measures of time poverty for the population as a whole and for various groups of individuals.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

Volume (Year): 10 (2006)
Issue (Month): 12 ()
Pages: 1-7

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Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-06j20004

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  1. Christiaensen, Luc & Scott, Christopher & Wodon, Quentin, 2002. "Poverty Measurement and Analysis," MPRA Paper 45362, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Paul Makdissi & Quentin Wodon, 2004. "Robust Comparisons of Natural Resources Depletion Indices," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 9(2), pages 1-9.
  3. Zhang, Junyi & Timmermans, Harry J. P. & Borgers, Aloys, 2005. "A model of household task allocation and time use," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 81-95, January.
  4. Apps, Patricia, 2003. "Gender, Time Use and Models of the Household," IZA Discussion Papers 796, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Wodon, Quentin & Beegle, Kathleen, 2006. "Labor Shortages Despite Underemployment? Seasonality in Time Use in Malawi," MPRA Paper 11083, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Daniel S. Hamermesh & Harley Frazis & Jay Stewart, 2005. "Data Watch: The American Time Use Survey," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 19(1), pages 221-232, Winter.
  7. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:9:y:2004:i:2:p:1-9 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. Ilahi, Nadeem, 2001. "Gender and the allocation of adult time : evidence from the Peru LSMS panel data," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2744, The World Bank.
  9. C. Mark Blackden & Quentin Wodon, 2006. "Gender, Time Use, and Poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7214.
  10. Alan Gelb, 2001. "Gender and Growth : Africa's Missed Potential," World Bank Other Operational Studies 9789, The World Bank.
  11. Constance Newman, 2002. "Gender, Time Use, and Change: The Impact of the Cut Flower Industry in Ecuador," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 16(3), pages 375-395, December.
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Cited by:
  1. Parra Osorio, Juan Carlos & Wodon, Quentin, 2010. "Gender, Time Use, and Labor Income in Guinea: Micro and Macro Analyses," MPRA Paper 28465, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Wodon, Quentin & Beegle, Kathleen, 2006. "Labor Shortages Despite Underemployment? Seasonality in Time Use in Malawi," MPRA Paper 11083, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Alkire, Sabina & Meinzen-Dick, Ruth & Peterman, Amber & Quisumbing, Agnes & Seymour, Greg & Vaz, Ana, 2013. "The Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 71-91.
  4. Auriol, Emmanuelle & Blanc, Aymeric, 2009. "Capture and corruption in public utilities: The cases of water and electricity in Sub-Saharan Africa," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 203-216, June.
  5. Goh, Amelia H. X., 2012. "A literature review of the gender-differentiated impacts of climate change on women's and men's assets and well-being in developing countries:," CAPRi working papers 106, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Kohlin, Gunnar & Sills, Erin O. & Pattanayak, Subhrendu K. & Wilfong, Christopher, 2011. "Energy, gender and development: what are the linkages ? where is the evidence ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5800, The World Bank.
  7. Hobbes, Marieke & De Groot, Wouter T. & Van Der Voet, Ester & Sarkhel, Sukanya, 2011. "Freely Disposable Time: A Time and Money Integrated Measure of Poverty and Freedom," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(12), pages 2055-2068.
  8. Naidu, Sirisha C., 2013. "Legal exclusions, private wealth and livelihoods: An analysis of work time allocation in protected areas," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 82-91.
  9. Antonopoulos, Rania, 2009. "The unpaid care work : paid work connection," ILO Working Papers 427404, International Labour Organization.
  10. Tim Rathjen, 2011. "Do Time Poor Individuals Pay More?," FFB-Discussionpaper 91, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)), LEUPHANA University Lüneburg.
  11. Najam Us Saqib & G. M. Arif, 2012. "Time Poverty, Work Status and Gender: The Case of Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 51(1), pages 23-46.
  12. Naidu, Sirisha C., 2011. "Gendered effects of work and participation in collective forest management," MPRA Paper 31091, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  13. Naidu, Sirisha C., 2011. "Rural Livelihoods, Forest Access and Time Use: A Study of Forest Communities in Northwest India," MPRA Paper 31060, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  14. Bardasi, Elena & Wodon, Quentin, 2006. "Poverty Reduction from Full Employment: A Time Use Approach," MPRA Paper 11084, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  15. Jamie Spinney & Hugh Millward, 2010. "Time and Money: A New Look at Poverty and the Barriers to Physical Activity in Canada," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 99(2), pages 341-356, November.

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