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Gender Differences in Domains of Job Satisfaction: Evidence from Doctoral Graduates from Australian Universities

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  • Temesgen Kifle

    ()
    (The School of Economics, University of Queensland, Room: 653, Colin Clark Building (39))

  • Isaac H. Desta

    ()
    (Faculty of Commerce, Catholic University of Eastern Africa, P. O. Box 62157-00200)

Abstract

Based on data from a study of graduates from PhD programs at the Australia’s Group of Eight (Go8) universities, a gender gap in job satisfaction domains is estimated using a Mann-Whitney U test. Findings from the aggregate model shows significant gender differences in only 5 out of 17 domains of job satisfaction. Further, separate analyses by age, employment status and family type/living arrangement broadly support the absence of gender differences in domains of job satisfaction. For aspects of job satisfaction that show significant gender differential it is found that males are more satisfied than females with their hours worked, opportunity for career advancement and workload, whereas females are more satisfied than males with their relationship with co-workers and contribution to society. This implies that males are more satisfied with intrinsic dimension of job satisfaction while females are more satisfied with extrinsic aspects of job satisfaction

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Queensland University of Technology (QUT), School of Economics and Finance in its journal Economic Analysis and Policy (EAP).

Volume (Year): 42 (2012)
Issue (Month): 3 (December)
Pages: 319-338

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Handle: RePEc:eap:articl:v:42:y:2012:i:3:p:319-338

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Related research

Keywords: Australia; doctoral graduates; domains of job satisfaction; gender; Go8 universities;

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References

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  1. Ward, Melanie E & Sloane, Peter J, 2000. "Non-pecuniary Advantages versus Pecuniary Disadvantages; Job Satisfaction among Male and Female Academics in Scottish Universities," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 47(3), pages 273-303, August.
  2. Adrian de la Garza & Giovanni Mastrobuoni & Atsushi Sannabe & Katsunori Yamada, 2010. "The Relative Utility Hypothesis With and Without Self-reported Reference Wages," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 159, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
  3. Dalton, Amy H. & Marcis, John G., 1987. "Gender differences in job satisfaction among young adults," Journal of Behavioral Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 21-32.
  4. Andrew Clark, . "Job Satisfaction and Gender. Why are Women so Happy at Work?," Economics Discussion Papers 415, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
  5. Mora, Toni & Ferrer-i-Carbonell, Ada, 2009. "The job satisfaction gender gap among young recent university graduates: Evidence from Catalonia," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 581-589, August.
  6. Keith A. Bender & John S. Heywood, 2006. "Job Satisfaction Of The Highly Educated: The Role Of Gender, Academic Tenure, And Earnings," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 53(2), pages 253-279, 05.
  7. Sousa-Poza, Alfonso & Sousa-Poza, Andres A., 2007. "The effect of job satisfaction on labor turnover by gender: An analysis for Switzerland," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 895-913, December.
  8. Andrew E. Clark & Paul Frijters & Michael A. Shields, 2008. "Relative Income, Happiness, and Utility: An Explanation for the Easterlin Paradox and Other Puzzles," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 46(1), pages 95-144, March.
  9. Anthea Long, 2005. "Happily Ever After? A Study of Job Satisfaction in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 81(255), pages 303-321, December.
  10. A. Sousa-Poza & A. A. Sousa-Poza, 2003. "Gender differences in job satisfaction in Great Britain, 1991-2000: permanent or transitory?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(11), pages 691-694.
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Cited by:
  1. HAURET Laetitia & WILLIAMS Donald R., 2013. "Cross-national analysis of gender differences in job satisfaction," CEPS/INSTEAD Working Paper Series 2013-27, CEPS/INSTEAD.

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