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Willingness to Pay for Malaria Insurance: A Case Study of Households in Ghana Using the Contingent Valuation Method

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  • Asafu-Adjaye, John
  • Dzator, Janet

    (School of Economics, Faculty of Business, Economics, and Law, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia)

Abstract

This paper reports the results of a study which estimated household willingness to participate in a malaria insurance scheme in Ghana using the contingent valuation method. The study was conducted in two communities representing rural and urban areas of the country. The results indicate a high level of support for the scheme, reflecting the social and economic importance of the disease. The level of premium that households were willing to pay was significantly influenced by income, years of formal education, occupation type and number of children in the household. The results show that an insurance programme which encourages "pre-saving" towards treatment fees could curtail self-medication and household decisions to delay seeking care, thereby promoting early and efficacious treatment of malaria.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Queensland University of Technology (QUT), School of Economics and Finance in its journal Economic Analysis and Policy (EAP).

Volume (Year): 33 (2003)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 31-47

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Handle: RePEc:eap:articl:v:33:y:2003:i:1:p:31-47

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Keywords: Insurance;

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  1. Echessah, Protase N. & Swallow, Brent M. & Kamara, Damaris W. & Curry, John J., 1997. "Willingness to contribute labor and money to tsetse control: Application of contingent valuation in Busia District, Kenya," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 239-253, February.
  2. Johannesson, Magnus & Johansson, Per-Olov & Kristrom, Bengt & Gerdtham, Ulf-G., 1993. "Willingness to pay for antihypertensive therapy -- further results," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 95-108, April.
  3. Whittington, Dale & Lauria, Donald T. & Mu, Xinming, 1991. "A study of water vending and willingness to pay for water in Onitsha, Nigeria," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 19(2-3), pages 179-198.
  4. Asenso-Okyere, W. Kwadwo & Osei-Akoto, Isaac & Anum, Adote & Appiah, Ernest N., 1997. "Willingness to pay for health insurance in a developing economy. A pilot study of the informal sector of Ghana using contingent valuation," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 223-237, December.
  5. Swallow, B. M. & Woudyalew, M., 1994. "Evaluating willingness to contribute to a local public good: Application of contingent valuation to tsetse control in Ethiopia," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 153-161, November.
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