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The Nigerian Educational Systems and Returns to Education

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  • Amaghionyeodiwe, L.A.

    ()

  • Osinubi, T.S.

    ()

Abstract

While each tier of education has at various times been the concurrent (joint) responsibility of both Federal and state governments, the former has historically been much more involved at the post secondary level. The shares of Federal Government recurrent and capital expenditures by level of education between 1996 and 2002. Over the period, the share for the (24) Federal universities has varied between roughly 40 and 50 percent of total Federal expenditures, while those for the (16) polytechnics and (20) colleges of education have remained fairly constant (apart from one year) at around 17 percent and 11 percent respectively. Overall, during the whole period, the tertiary education sub sector has received between 68 percent and 80 percent of the total Federal expenditures for education.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Euro-American Association of Economic Development in its journal International Journal of Applied Econometrics and Quantitative Studies .

Volume (Year): 3 (2006)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 31-40

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Handle: RePEc:eaa:ijaeqs:v:3:y2006:i:1_2

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Related research

Keywords: Educational System; Returns to Education; Universities Financing in Nigeria;

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References

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  1. Pereira, Pedro T. & Martins, Pedro S., 2000. "Does Education Reduce Wage Inequality? Quantile Regressions Evidence from Fifteen European Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 120, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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  11. World Bank, 2002. "Constructing Knowledge Societies : New Challenges for Tertiary Education," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15224, March.
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Cited by:
  1. Lloyd Ahamefule AMAGHIONYEODIWE & Tokunbo Simbowale OSINUBI, 2007. "Do Higher Levels Of Schooling Lead To Higher Returns To Education In Nigeria?," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 7(1).

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