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Education And Labour Market Transitions Amongst Compulsory Education Graduates And School Dropouts

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  • ALBERT VERDÚ, Cecilia
  • DAVIA, María A.

Abstract

This paper intends to describe the diversity of paths followed by young people who either drop out or finish compulsory education in Spain. To that aim we deploy optimal matching analysis to analyse a sample of youngsters drawn from a longitudinal data-set (ETEFIL-2005). Their trajectories in the education system and the labour market are clustered into six different patterns. The profiles of youths following each of the broad types of trajectories are described. Academic attainment in compulsory education is found to be very relevant in the determination of the trajectories followed. Social background is crucial for both initial academic results and final educational outcomes.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Euro-American Association of Economic Development in its journal Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies.

Volume (Year): 10 (2010)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:eaa:eerese:v:10:y2010:i:3_1

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Related research

Keywords: school-to-work transitions; compulsory education; youth labour markets;

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  1. Duncan McVicar & Michael Anyadike-Danes, 2002. "Predicting successful and unsuccessful transitions from school to work by using sequence methods," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 165(2), pages 317-334.
  2. Michael Anyadike-Danes & Duncan McVicar, 2010. "My Brilliant Career: Characterizing the Early Labor Market Trajectories of British Women From Generation X," Sociological Methods & Research, , vol. 38(3), pages 482-512, February.
  3. Glenda Quintini & Thomas Manfredi, 2009. "Going Separate Ways? School-to-Work Transitions in the United States and Europe," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 90, OECD Publishing.
  4. Christian Brzinsky-Fay & Ulrich Kohler & Magdalena Luniak, 2006. "Sequence analysis with Stata," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 6(4), pages 435-460, December.
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