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On the Detection of Business Cycles Asymmetry in 22 Countries, 1870-1994

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  • Cook, S.

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    Abstract

    Business cycle asymmetry is examined using annual observations on GDP for 22 economies over the period 1870 to 1994. The present paper extends recent research in a number of ways. First, a non-parametric testing procedure is adopted which is robust to outliers. Second, alternative methods of filtering are considered as methods of deriving the underlying cyclical component of GDP for each of the economies examined. Finally, split samples are analyzed in addition to the long-run sample. In comparison to previous research, more widespread evidence of business cycle asymmetry is detected. Interestingly, it is found that analysis of the whole sample masks variation in the properties of the GDP for the alternative economies in the pre- and post-World War II periods. More precisely, it is found that although little evidence of asymmetry is present in the period to 1945, extensive asymmetry is present after 1945.

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    File URL: http://www.usc.es/economet/reviews/aeid417.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Euro-American Association of Economic Development in its journal Applied Econometrics and International Development.

    Volume (Year): 4 (2004)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages:

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    Handle: RePEc:eaa:aeinde:v:4:y:2004:i:1_7

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    1. Zacharias Psaradakis & Martin Sola, 2003. "On detrending and cyclical asymmetry," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(3), pages 271-289.
    2. Rhee, Wooheon & Rich, Robert W., 1995. "Inflation and the asymmetric effects of money on output fluctuations," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 683-702.
    3. Morten O. Ravn & Harald Uhlig, 2002. "On adjusting the Hodrick-Prescott filter for the frequency of observations," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(2), pages 371-375.
    4. Cover, James Peery, 1992. "Asymmetric Effects of Positive and Negative Money-Supply Shocks," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 107(4), pages 1261-82, November.
    5. Sichel, D.E., 1988. "Business Cycle Asymmetry: A Deeper Look," Papers 85, Princeton, Department of Economics - Financial Research Center.
    6. Marianne Baxter & Robert G. King, 1999. "Measuring Business Cycles: Approximate Band-Pass Filters For Economic Time Series," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(4), pages 575-593, November.
    7. W.A. Razzak, 2001. "Business Cycle Asymmetries: International Evidence," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 4(1), pages 230-243, January.
    8. Ramsey, James B & Rothman, Philip, 1996. "Time Irreversibility and Business Cycle Asymmetry," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 28(1), pages 1-21, February.
    9. Harvey, A C & Jaeger, A, 1993. "Detrending, Stylized Facts and the Business Cycle," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(3), pages 231-47, July-Sept.
    10. Robert J. Hodrick & Edward Prescott, 1981. "Post-War U.S. Business Cycles: An Empirical Investigation," Discussion Papers 451, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
    11. Arden, Richard, et al, 2000. "The Asymmetric Effects of Monetary Policy: Some Results from a Macroeconometric Model," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 68(4), pages 419-41, Special I.
    12. Cooley, T.F. & Ohanian, L.E., 1989. "The Cyclical Behavior Of Prices," RCER Working Papers 188, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
    13. Randal Verbrugge Randal Verbrugge, 1997. "Investigating Cyclical Asymmetries," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 2(1), pages 1-10, April.
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