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Socio-economic inequalities in mortality and health in the developing world

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  • FFF1Alberto NNN1Minujin

    (UNICEF)

  • FFF2Enrique NNN2Delamonica

    (UNICEF)

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    Abstract

    Trends in child mortality disparities show that within country inequities have remained constant in some countries and worsened in most of the other ones. Only three countries, with relatively small populations which comprise less than 2 per cent of our sample, were able to achieve both a reduction in disparity and improvements (or no decline) in national average U5MR. The evolution of nutrition and DPT3 immunisation seems more promising.

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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/special/2/13/s2-13.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research Special Collections.

    Volume (Year): 2 (2004)
    Issue (Month): 13 (April)
    Pages: 331-354

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:drspec:v:2:y:2004:i:13

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    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

    Related research

    Keywords: developing countries; equity; inequality; socio-economic; socio-economic trends; under-five mortality; wealth gap;

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    1. Cornia, G.A., 1999. "Liberalization, Globalization and Income Distribution," Research Paper 157, World Institute for Development Economics Research.
    2. Sahn, David E. & Stifel, David C., 2000. "Poverty Comparisons Over Time and Across Countries in Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(12), pages 2123-2155, December.
    3. Filmer, Deon & Pritchett, Lant, 1998. "Estimating wealth effects without expenditure data - or tears : with an application to educational enrollments in states of India," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1994, The World Bank.
    4. Deirdre N. McCloskey & Stephen T. Ziliak, 1996. "The Standard Error of Regressions," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 34(1), pages 97-114, March.
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    Cited by:
    1. Rodrigo R. Soares, 2007. "On the Determinants of Mortality Reductions in the Developing World," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 33(2), pages 247-287.
    2. Fred Pampel & Justin Denney, 2011. "Cross-National Sources of Health Inequality: Education and Tobacco Use in the World Health Survey," Demography, Springer, vol. 48(2), pages 653-674, May.

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